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2010

  • Elections are approaching… please act right away to urge your members of Congress to send a letter to the Fish and Wildlife Service demanding that they take immediate action to save Mexican gray wolves!

    After they were nearly wiped off the face of the earth, Mexican gray wolves were returned to the wild in 1998 through the efforts of people like you. Today, they desperately need your help to bring them back from the brink of extinction.

    The situation is dire. The population is declining and only 42 Mexican wolves remained in the wilds of the Southwest in early 2010. This summer, two of those remaining wolves were found shot to death and a third wolf was found dead under suspicious circumstances, leaving gaping holes in families raising dependent pups.

    These highly endangered animals can be brought back from the brink of extinction and successfully recovered. But only if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency responsible for their recovery, takes the necessary actions. Your members of Congress can make that happen, and they need to hear from you.

    VISIT OUR CAMPAIGN PAGE to learn more and send your representatives a message.

  • Elections are approaching… please act right away to urge your members of Congress to send a letter to the Fish and Wildlife Service demanding that they take immediate action to save Mexican gray wolves!

    After they were nearly wiped off the face of the earth, Mexican gray wolves were returned to the wild in 1998 through the efforts of people like you. Today, they desperately need your help to bring them back from the brink of extinction.

    The situation is dire. The population is declining and only 42 Mexican wolves remained in the wilds of the Southwest in early 2010. This summer, two of those remaining wolves were found shot to death and a third wolf was found dead under suspicious circumstances, leaving gaping holes in families raising dependent pups.

    These highly endangered animals can be brought back from the brink of extinction and successfully recovered. But only if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency responsible for their recovery, takes the necessary actions. Your members of Congress can make that happen, and they need to hear from you.

    VISIT OUR CAMPAIGN PAGE to learn more and send your representatives a message.

  • For Immediate Release
    Date: 5/25/10
    Contact: Whitney Potter
    Phone: (505) 346-6781
    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    From the Office of Rep. Martin Heinrich, 5/25/10

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, U.S. Representative Martin Heinrich (NM-1) introduced legislation that would protect two areas of land in central New Mexico. The bill adds the Crest of Montezuma to the north end of the Cibola National Forest and extends a wilderness designation to the Manzano Wilderness Study Area to the south.

    “For families living near Placitas, this legislation will ensure their access to critical water infrastructure for farm irrigation and other important uses,” said Rep. Heinrich during a speech on the floor of the House of Representatives today. “It will also ensure that East Mountain families can use these places for recreation. Finally, it will preserve the areas’ critical role as a wildlife corridor for animals that migrate from north to south across our state.

    “The Sandia and Manzano mountains are important to our quality of life, and high quality public lands are also important for attracting the jobs of the future that a strong quality of life help bring in,” said Jeremy Vesbach, director,New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “We are thankful to Representative Heinrich for working to protect the mountains we all love and care about, our kids and our economy benefit from actions like this.”

    “Today’s introduction of legislation to add land to the Cibola National Forest, including additions to the Manzano Wilderness, makes it clear that Representative Heinrich is a champion for preserving New Mexico’s outstanding public lands for future generations,” said Nathan Newcomer, associate director,New Mexico Wilderness Alliance.

    ###

  • Conservationists Cheer Rep. Lujan’s Companion Legislation

    Representative Ben Lujan’s introduction of legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives today to protect nearly 236,000 acres in northern New Mexico was hailed as an important step forward in ensuring this wild land stays as it is for future generations. The measure is the House companion legislation to the Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act, introduced by Senator Jeff Bingaman in the U.S. Senate.

    “We are pleased that Congressman Lujan is championing this important measure in Congress, and look forward to working with him to see this conservation bill become law this year,” said John Olivas, Northern Director of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, based in Mora. “New Mexicans value their hunting and outdoor traditions, and this legislation will enable us to pass down those traditions to our children and grandchildren.”

    Nearly 236,000 acres will be designated as a National Conservation Area (NCA), including two wilderness areas – the 13,420-acre Cerro del Yuta Wilderness (the iconic Ute Mountain) and the 8,000-acre Rio San Antonio Wilderness. The area includes some of New Mexico’s most spectacular landscapes, including the Rio Grande gorge – which at some places is a half mile wide across, dropping to the Rio Grande River 800 feet below, and is a vital migratory flyway for a number of bird species.

    “Those of us with deep roots here appreciate that this legislation preserves grazing within the National Conservation Area and specifically protects our right to hunt, fish and collect piñon nuts and firewood,” said Esther Garcia, President of San Antonio Del Rio Colorado Land Grant and Mayor of Questa. “It directs the Bureau of Land Management to protect the cultural, natural and scenic resources in the area, and protects rights granted under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. This measure will help ensure that we are good stewards of the land.”

    The legislation is broadly backed by area businesses, which recognize the importance of wilderness designation to local economies. Supporters include the Taos Chamber of Commerce, the Mora Valley Chamber of Commerce, the Taos County Commission, and more than one hundred local businesses.

  • New Mexico – Birthplace of Wilderness Twice Over

    New Mexico Wilderness Alliance members know that our state is the birthplace of wilderness, but few realize that this is doubly true. Creation of the Gila Wilderness in 1924 in Gila National Forest set an extremely important precedent. However, the 1985 establishment of the Bisti and De Na Zin Badlands wildernesses in the San Juan Basin was an equally pioneering event. These first-ever BLM wildernesses began a paradigm change within an agency whose sole purpose had been to encourage exploitation of Public Lands. Today the BLM manages 222 official wilderness areas totaling 8.6 million acres in 10 western states. That’s very significant progress for an federal organization which up until 1976 was only a “temporary” agency charged with disposing of Public Lands.  It all started with the San Juan Basin Badlands.

    The San Juan Basin Badlands Coalition Campaign

    When NMWA spearheaded efforts to get the Ojito Badlands wilderness status in 2005, we broke a 17-year dry spell in wilderness formation for New Mexico and established another precedent: coalition building among the state’s diverse environmental organizations.

    Badlands overview 250x204

    Click on map for larger image

    Now NMWA is again acting on behalf of the 14 San Juan Basin Badlands by joining with the Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club and the Southwest Chapter of the Wilderness Society to form a San Juan Basin Badlands Coalition. While our long range goal is to upgrade permanent protection levels for all the SJB Badlands by working with the BLM, the New Mexico congressional delegation, and contiguous Native American and ranching communities, our immediate focus is on 6 badlands that lie within the BLM’s Rio Puerco Field Office jurisdiction: Cejita Blanca, Ceja Pelon, Mesa Penistaja, Mesa Chijuilla, Mesa de Cuba, and La Lena.

    We recognize that all 14 SJB Badlands have unique scenic, ecological, scientific, educational, and recreational resources which deserve much greater recognition and protection, but we currently have the best chance to directly influence BLM management practices regarding the 6 badlands mentioned above. Visit PhotoTrekNM.com for extensive SJB badlands info and 1000-plus images.

    SJB Badlands Coalition Campaign Mission Statement

    The goal is to mobilize as many people as possible to be ready to submit comments to the BLM’s Rio Puerco Field Office on behalf of 6 SJB badlands under their jurisdiction when the office publishes it’s new Resource Management Plan this December. This first draft publication begins a 90 day public comment period. The public’s preferences are then incorporated into the final version which will guide the Rio Puerco Field Office’s management decisions for up to 20 years.

    Previous work with the Rio Puerco Field Office involving badland tours and follow up meetings really paid off. One of the alternative management strategies in their upcoming RMP draft is to treat the badlands as Special Recreation Management Areas or SRMAs. Besides elevated protection, this designation carries extra funding to help with the management practices. We need to get as many pro-SRMA badlands comments into the Rio Puerco office as possible once the comment period starts.

    We realize that SRMA designation is an important first step that should be followed by more permanent legislative actions. But considering that most of these six badlands where virtually unknown or at least unnoticed by the BLM just a year ago, this is a quantum leap in agency awareness and a strong precedent for further legislative action.

    YOUR NEXT STEP: VISIT THE BADLANDS!

    A number of hikes led by Badlands activist Mike Richie in Fall 2010 received rave reviews and raised awareness of this unique region. Stay tuned to our events calendar for future hikes. For more information on hiking in the Badlands, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Ah, wilderness; ah, politics …

    The New Mexican
    Posted: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 – 12/15/10

    Hope springs eternal, as Alexander Pope wryly noted so long ago — and among New Mexico and national environmentalists, darned if hope isn’t lurching along in the wake of Republican victories in last month’s election.

    The elephants are set to run rampant in the House of Representatives, and their filibustering strength in the Senate will be greater in the coming Congress. But will the new Capitol Hill lineup really lead to wholesale trashing of conservationists’ recent reforms? And should they set aside their preservation wish list until Democrats are back in charge of both chambers?

    Much may depend on the sense of shame among Congress members bought by Corporate America. Many are aware of the taint they’re carrying to Washington, thanks to the obscene amounts of money it took to win them their seats; some, perhaps, might already be wondering what token measure they could pass to give themselves a good-guy sheen.

    Well, we can think of one right off the bat: a proposal for federal-wilderness designation down in Southern New Mexico. Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall have been trying to get a quarter-million acres in the Organ and Potrillo mountains set aside as wilderness.

    The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Wilderness Act got unanimous approval last summer from the Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee — chaired by Bingaman. Ten members of that committee are Republican, and 13 Democrat, so the spirit of bipartisanship enjoyed a brief flight. Since then, though, the Senate and the House have had plenty more on their plate — so if the bill makes it through this harried Congress, we’d be surprised; still, stranger things have happened …

    As Bingaman notes, New Mexico’s congressional delegation has been trying since the Reagan days to protect the spectacular landscapes at the southern end of our state. Republican power-player Pete Domenici was part of the effort.

    In recent years, there’s been a strong challenge to the idea — on, uh, national-security grounds: The area in question comes close to the Mexican border; the Fortress America bloc argues that wilderness protection would make it prime smuggling territory.

    To ease jittery nerves, our senators have provided for a five-mile-wide strip of non-wilderness, which the Border Patrol, the National Guard, the Army and assorted vigilantes could patrol to their hearts’ content.

    Progress of this proposal, now or in the next Congress, also could depend on Mexico: If violence gets worse there, alarms could be raised by incoming Gov. Susana Martínez, who makes much of her border-protecting prowess, and Rep. Steve Pearce, whose district includes lots of borderland.

    But today’s reality is empty wilderness: Illegal immigration into New Mexico is down to a trickle — and the border itself, sadly, is turning from faint fences and openness into a fiercely fortified line.

    So the Bingaman-Udall bill sits there, a measure both parties could claim as a fine environmental trophy to be waved in campaigns a year or so down the road.

    We’d love to see this wilderness bill wiggle through the confusion certain to grow in days to come — but if it doesn’t, it could be a call to conscience for the next Congress.

  • Ah, wilderness; ah, politics …

    The New Mexican
    Posted: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 – 12/15/10

    Hope springs eternal, as Alexander Pope wryly noted so long ago — and among New Mexico and national environmentalists, darned if hope isn’t lurching along in the wake of Republican victories in last month’s election.

    The elephants are set to run rampant in the House of Representatives, and their filibustering strength in the Senate will be greater in the coming Congress. But will the new Capitol Hill lineup really lead to wholesale trashing of conservationists’ recent reforms? And should they set aside their preservation wish list until Democrats are back in charge of both chambers?

    Much may depend on the sense of shame among Congress members bought by Corporate America. Many are aware of the taint they’re carrying to Washington, thanks to the obscene amounts of money it took to win them their seats; some, perhaps, might already be wondering what token measure they could pass to give themselves a good-guy sheen.

    Well, we can think of one right off the bat: a proposal for federal-wilderness designation down in Southern New Mexico. Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall have been trying to get a quarter-million acres in the Organ and Potrillo mountains set aside as wilderness.

    The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Wilderness Act got unanimous approval last summer from the Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee — chaired by Bingaman. Ten members of that committee are Republican, and 13 Democrat, so the spirit of bipartisanship enjoyed a brief flight. Since then, though, the Senate and the House have had plenty more on their plate — so if the bill makes it through this harried Congress, we’d be surprised; still, stranger things have happened …

    As Bingaman notes, New Mexico’s congressional delegation has been trying since the Reagan days to protect the spectacular landscapes at the southern end of our state. Republican power-player Pete Domenici was part of the effort.

    In recent years, there’s been a strong challenge to the idea — on, uh, national-security grounds: The area in question comes close to the Mexican border; the Fortress America bloc argues that wilderness protection would make it prime smuggling territory.

    To ease jittery nerves, our senators have provided for a five-mile-wide strip of non-wilderness, which the Border Patrol, the National Guard, the Army and assorted vigilantes could patrol to their hearts’ content.

    Progress of this proposal, now or in the next Congress, also could depend on Mexico: If violence gets worse there, alarms could be raised by incoming Gov. Susana Martínez, who makes much of her border-protecting prowess, and Rep. Steve Pearce, whose district includes lots of borderland.

    But today’s reality is empty wilderness: Illegal immigration into New Mexico is down to a trickle — and the border itself, sadly, is turning from faint fences and openness into a fiercely fortified line.

    So the Bingaman-Udall bill sits there, a measure both parties could claim as a fine environmental trophy to be waved in campaigns a year or so down the road.

    We’d love to see this wilderness bill wiggle through the confusion certain to grow in days to come — but if it doesn’t, it could be a call to conscience for the next Congress.

  • On Tuesday, November 30, members of Congress will return from recess and will have a narrow window of time in their lame-duck session to pass legislation.

    Many bills are being considered. Among them, an Omnibus Public Lands package being assembled by US Sentator Jeff Bingaman, to include legislation on the El Rio Grande Del Norte and the Organ Mountains, 700,000 acres of public lands that deserve permanent protection.

    We need your help to push Congress to make passage of an Omnibus Public Lands Bill in 2010 their top priority.

    Please, take a few minutes on Tuesday, November 30th to place a call to your Congressional representatives. Tell them that it is extremely important that they pass an Omnibus Public Lands Bill before the end of this session.

    This will be the most important call for wilderness you’ll make all year.

    SENATOR JEFF BINGAMAN
    Washington DC: 202-224-5521
    Toll free in New Mexico: 800-443-8658

    SENATOR TOM UDALL
    Washington DC: 202-224-6621

    Our voices, combined, will make all the difference.

    If you can’t make a phone call on Tuesday, you can still make your voice heard:VISIT OUR ONLINE ACTION CENTER to send your Congressional representatives a free fax urging action on an Omnibus Lands Bill in 2010.

    If you have questions or need assistance, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 505-843-8696 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    Thank you in advance for making this important call.

    700,000 acres protected in 2010 — we need an Omnibus NOW!

  • On Tuesday, November 30, members of Congress will return from recess and will have a narrow window of time in their lame-duck session to pass legislation.

    Many bills are being considered. Among them, an Omnibus Public Lands package being assembled by US Sentator Jeff Bingaman, to include legislation on the El Rio Grande Del Norte and the Organ Mountains, 700,000 acres of public lands that deserve permanent protection.

    We need your help to push Congress to make passage of an Omnibus Public Lands Bill in 2010 their top priority.

    Please, take a few minutes on Tuesday, November 30th to place a call to your Congressional representatives. Tell them that it is extremely important that they pass an Omnibus Public Lands Bill before the end of this session.

    This will be the most important call for wilderness you’ll make all year.

    SENATOR JEFF BINGAMAN
    Washington DC: 202-224-5521
    Toll free in New Mexico: 800-443-8658

    SENATOR TOM UDALL
    Washington DC: 202-224-6621

    Our voices, combined, will make all the difference.

    If you can’t make a phone call on Tuesday, you can still make your voice heard:VISIT OUR ONLINE ACTION CENTER to send your Congressional representatives a free fax urging action on an Omnibus Lands Bill in 2010.

    If you have questions or need assistance, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 505-843-8696 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    Thank you in advance for making this important call.

    700,000 acres protected in 2010 — we need an Omnibus NOW!

  • On July 1, the US Fish and Wildlife Service reported the shooting death of the alpha male from the Hawks’ Nest Pack in eastern Arizona.

    Last week, the alpha male of the San Mateo Pack in New Mexico was found dead under suspicious circumstances. Both killings are under investigation by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Environmental groups are offering up to an additional $40,000 to the Fish and Wildlife Service’s $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of those involved with the deplorable killing of these wolves.

    CLICK HERE to download the reward poster— and repost in your neighborhood or place of work.

    This latest blow to the Mexican wolf reintroduction effort brings home the importance of supporting wolf conservation and public education efforts. NMWA is contributing to the cause with the launch of our Mexican Wolf Stamp program, which will raise awareness and raise funds for groups working in Mexican gray wolf conservation. Please click here to learn more about the 2011 Wolf Stamp.

    In addition, the organization Lobos of the Southwest has started a letter-writing campaign in response to these latest crimes against  wild wolves. CLICK HERE TO VISIT THEIR WEBSITE and get involved.

  • On July 1, the US Fish and Wildlife Service reported the shooting death of the alpha male from the Hawks’ Nest Pack in eastern Arizona.

    Last week, the alpha male of the San Mateo Pack in New Mexico was found dead under suspicious circumstances. Both killings are under investigation by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Environmental groups are offering up to an additional $40,000 to the Fish and Wildlife Service’s $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of those involved with the deplorable killing of these wolves.

    CLICK HERE to download the reward poster— and repost in your neighborhood or place of work.

    This latest blow to the Mexican wolf reintroduction effort brings home the importance of supporting wolf conservation and public education efforts. NMWA is contributing to the cause with the launch of our Mexican Wolf Stamp program, which will raise awareness and raise funds for groups working in Mexican gray wolf conservation. Please click here to learn more about the 2011 Wolf Stamp.

    In addition, the organization Lobos of the Southwest has started a letter-writing campaign in response to these latest crimes against  wild wolves. CLICK HERE TO VISIT THEIR WEBSITE and get involved.

  • Take Action to Protect Wolves and the Endangered Species Act

    Update: Bill Introduced to Strip Endangered Species Act Protections From Gray Wolves and Grizzlies

    Many, many thanks to all who have contacted the Obama administration with messages opposing Interior Secretary Salazar’s pledge to support legislative delisting of gray wolves. Many of you said you’d also contacted your members of Congress. This is especially timely, since eight Western Caucus members introduced an anti-wolf bill yesterday, the “State Sovereignty Wildlife Management Act”.

    The text is simple and deadly:

    “Notwithstanding any other provision of law (including regulations), the inclusion of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) (including any gray wolf designated as “non-essential experimental”) on any list of endangered species or threatened species under section 4(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 … shall have no force or effect.”

    If this bill passes, all gray wolves will lose their endangered species protections, including the fewer than 50 Mexican gray wolves that remain in the wild.

    Please, if you haven’t written or called the White House yet, do it now. If you haven’t contacted your members of  Congress, please do it now. And ask everyone you know to do the same.

    According to a November 29 article in the Washington Post, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar made a back-room pledge to Western governors this week that the administration will back congressional efforts to strip gray wolves of their endangered species status. Salazar also issued a public statement that he supported delisting for gray wolves.

    An article in Reuters on December 1 reported that Dan Strickland, Assistant Interior Secretary for Fish, Wildlife and Parks, said the Obama administration planned to propose lifting Endangered Species Act protection for wolves in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, and would seek congressional action if necessary.

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires that decisions on delisting be based on the best available science. Never  before has a species been taken off the endangered species list by an act of Congress that would amend the ESA.

    We can’t let this happen now. Obama needs to be held to his promise to preserve scientific integrity.

    Supporters of wolves and other wildlife need to flood the White House and Congress with  protests against this congressional end-run around the Endangered Species Act.

    Please, call or write right away and tell everyone you know to do the same. None of our wildlife is safe if the Obama administration is willing to let political considerations trump science and law.

    Visit our Online Action Center to send free faxes to Congress and the President.

    You can also email comments to the President using this form on the White House website.

    The White House phone line for comments is: 202-456-1111

  • Take Action to Protect Wolves and the Endangered Species Act

    Update: Bill Introduced to Strip Endangered Species Act Protections From Gray Wolves and Grizzlies

    Many, many thanks to all who have contacted the Obama administration with messages opposing Interior Secretary Salazar’s pledge to support legislative delisting of gray wolves. Many of you said you’d also contacted your members of Congress. This is especially timely, since eight Western Caucus members introduced an anti-wolf bill yesterday, the “State Sovereignty Wildlife Management Act”.

    The text is simple and deadly:

    “Notwithstanding any other provision of law (including regulations), the inclusion of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) (including any gray wolf designated as “non-essential experimental”) on any list of endangered species or threatened species under section 4(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 … shall have no force or effect.”

    If this bill passes, all gray wolves will lose their endangered species protections, including the fewer than 50 Mexican gray wolves that remain in the wild.

    Please, if you haven’t written or called the White House yet, do it now. If you haven’t contacted your members of  Congress, please do it now. And ask everyone you know to do the same.

    According to a November 29 article in the Washington Post, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar made a back-room pledge to Western governors this week that the administration will back congressional efforts to strip gray wolves of their endangered species status. Salazar also issued a public statement that he supported delisting for gray wolves.

    An article in Reuters on December 1 reported that Dan Strickland, Assistant Interior Secretary for Fish, Wildlife and Parks, said the Obama administration planned to propose lifting Endangered Species Act protection for wolves in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, and would seek congressional action if necessary.

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires that decisions on delisting be based on the best available science. Never  before has a species been taken off the endangered species list by an act of Congress that would amend the ESA.

    We can’t let this happen now. Obama needs to be held to his promise to preserve scientific integrity.

    Supporters of wolves and other wildlife need to flood the White House and Congress with  protests against this congressional end-run around the Endangered Species Act.

    Please, call or write right away and tell everyone you know to do the same. None of our wildlife is safe if the Obama administration is willing to let political considerations trump science and law.

    Visit our Online Action Center to send free faxes to Congress and the President.

    You can also email comments to the President using this form on the White House website.

    The White House phone line for comments is: 202-456-1111

  • da econ small

    The Hispano Chamber of Commerce de Las Cruces is joining forces with the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance to campaign in support of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Wilderness Act.

    This partnership is based on the solid fact: “Wilderness Helps Communities Prosper.”

    For a look into the creative fruits of our relationship with the Hispano Chamber of Commerce and its members, we are pleased to share the brochure and poster avaliable for download below.

    econ broch thm

    Read this brochure to find
    out why over 300 Las 
    Cruces business support
    wilderness designation!

    econ poster thm

    Does your business
    support wilderness?
    Download a copy of
    this elegant poster!

  • da econ small

    The Hispano Chamber of Commerce de Las Cruces is joining forces with the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance to campaign in support of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Wilderness Act.

    This partnership is based on the solid fact: “Wilderness Helps Communities Prosper.”

    For a look into the creative fruits of our relationship with the Hispano Chamber of Commerce and its members, we are pleased to share the brochure and poster avaliable for download below.

    econ broch thm

    Read this brochure to find
    out why over 300 Las 
    Cruces business support
    wilderness designation!

    econ poster thm

    Does your business
    support wilderness?
    Download a copy of
    this elegant poster!

  • The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is pleased to offer a limited edition of the first Conservation Wolf Stamp sold in the United States.

    The 2011 Wolf Stamp pictured here is not a postage stamp, but the first in an annual series of framing-quality art prints offered to collectors.

    The Mexican Gray Wolf is the most endangered wolf in the world, with a total population of less than 50 in the wild in 2009.

    The Conservation Wolf Stamp is a project created by the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. The concept is similar to the Duck Stamp sold by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, except no hunting will be related to the sale of the Wolf Stamp. Instead, proceeds will be used for a  Conservation Wolf Stamp Fund, administered by NMWA and distributed to organizations and individuals working for Mexican Gray Wolf recovery. NMWA awarded its first Conservation Wolf Stamp Grant in November 2010, to conservationist Elke Duerr for her Wild Wolf Film project. READ THE PRESS RELEASE here.

    The cost is $20 (+$2 for S/H) for a 3×5 inch stamp, designed by New Mexico artist Virginia Maria Romero.

    CLICK HERE to order online, or contact Trisha London for further information  at [505] 843-8696 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    For more information on the artist, visit her website at http://virginiamariaromero.com/

  • The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is pleased to offer a limited edition of the first Conservation Wolf Stamp sold in the United States.

    The 2011 Wolf Stamp pictured here is not a postage stamp, but the first in an annual series of framing-quality art prints offered to collectors.

    The Mexican Gray Wolf is the most endangered wolf in the world, with a total population of less than 50 in the wild in 2009.

    The Conservation Wolf Stamp is a project created by the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. The concept is similar to the Duck Stamp sold by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, except no hunting will be related to the sale of the Wolf Stamp. Instead, proceeds will be used for a  Conservation Wolf Stamp Fund, administered by NMWA and distributed to organizations and individuals working for Mexican Gray Wolf recovery. NMWA awarded its first Conservation Wolf Stamp Grant in November 2010, to conservationist Elke Duerr for her Wild Wolf Film project. READ THE PRESS RELEASE here.

    The cost is $20 (+$2 for S/H) for a 3×5 inch stamp, designed by New Mexico artist Virginia Maria Romero.

    CLICK HERE to order online, or contact Trisha London for further information  at [505] 843-8696 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    For more information on the artist, visit her website at http://virginiamariaromero.com/

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