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2011

  • PUBLIC EDUCATION HEROES

    Elke Duerr – Wild Wolf Film, New Mexico

    Elke DuerrThe mission of Elke Duerr’s Wild Wolf Film Project: “to use film, digital media, and community outreach to advance the recovery of the Mexican Gray Wolf and other endangered species by teaching about their role in the ecosystem, and providing creative solutions to a healthy long term relationship between nature and humans.”

    Elke’s presentations on the Mexican Gray Wolf at New Mexico schools, libraries, galleries, and other public places are opening minds, eyes, and hearts to the plight of the world’s most endangered wolf. Her presentations feature footage from her film examining the Mexican wolf recovery project, “Stories of Wolves: The Lobo Returns” and storytelling to promote the peaceful coexistence of humans and wildlife.

    Learn more:

    Visit to the Wild Wolf Film website
    Read NM Wild’s Press Release: First Wolf Conservation Stamp Grant Awarded to Wild Wolf Film

  • We are part of a nationwide groundswell of support for wildlife– and disgust at misguided policies that threaten endangered species to this day. Do your part for our growing movement by signing on to the petitions below. Wolves Belong!

    1. Stop Aerial Gunning of Wolves in Alaska

    The Alaska Department of Fish & Game has asked the USFWS to allow it to kill wolves from airplanes and/or helicopters on Unimak Island, part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. ADF&G claims this action is necessary to save the caribou herd on the island. However, wolves are being used as scapegoats; the main problem is that hunting has selectively removed bull caribou from the herd.

    Wolves belong in Alaskan ecosystems. We can’t let the Fish and Wildlife Service open the door to aerial gunning throughout Alaska’s public lands– an unsportsmanlike goal of Sarah Palin’s.

    Sign on to the Alaska Wildlife Alliance’s online petition, at:
    http://www.akwildlife.org/

    2. Ban the Inhumane Poisoning of Wolves and Wildlife

    A female gray wolf from Montana’s Mill Creek pack was recently found dead,  illegally killed with “Compound 1080.”  This deadly chemical causes excruciating suffering before death. It is legally used by the Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services to kill coyotes, but protected wildlife, like this wolf,  can also fall victim.

    This petition urges the EPA to ban the use of deadly Compound 1080 and sodium cyanide to kill wildlife.

    Sign on to the Defenders of Wildlife online petition, at:
    https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2009

  • We are part of a nationwide groundswell of support for wildlife– and disgust at misguided policies that threaten endangered species to this day. Do your part for our growing movement by signing on to the petitions below. Wolves Belong!

    1. Stop Aerial Gunning of Wolves in Alaska

    The Alaska Department of Fish & Game has asked the USFWS to allow it to kill wolves from airplanes and/or helicopters on Unimak Island, part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. ADF&G claims this action is necessary to save the caribou herd on the island. However, wolves are being used as scapegoats; the main problem is that hunting has selectively removed bull caribou from the herd.

    Wolves belong in Alaskan ecosystems. We can’t let the Fish and Wildlife Service open the door to aerial gunning throughout Alaska’s public lands– an unsportsmanlike goal of Sarah Palin’s.

    Sign on to the Alaska Wildlife Alliance’s online petition, at:
    http://www.akwildlife.org/

    2. Ban the Inhumane Poisoning of Wolves and Wildlife

    A female gray wolf from Montana’s Mill Creek pack was recently found dead,  illegally killed with “Compound 1080.”  This deadly chemical causes excruciating suffering before death. It is legally used by the Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services to kill coyotes, but protected wildlife, like this wolf,  can also fall victim.

    This petition urges the EPA to ban the use of deadly Compound 1080 and sodium cyanide to kill wildlife.

    Sign on to the Defenders of Wildlife online petition, at:
    https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2009

  • save otero mesa
     
    TAKE ACTION NOW.
     
    Send a free fax to President Obama at our Online Action Center.
     
    After we’ve worked successfully for more than a decade to protect New Mexico’s wild desert grassland Otero Mesa from oil and gas drilling, a new threat has emerged – hardrock mining. A mining company has staked dozens of mining claims on Otero Mesa in recent months, and plans to conduct exploratory drilling for rare earth minerals. The mining claims are in areas we’ve proposed for wilderness protection and “area of critical environmental concern” designation, and where we hope the Obama administration will designate a national monument.
     
    Otero Mesa is one of the largest and wildest Chihuahuan desert grassland remaining on public lands in the United States. Thousands of ancient cultural sites can be found in Otero Mesa, including on Alamo Mountain, where petroglyphs date back 1500 years. Furthermore, the Salt Basin aquifer underlying Otero Mesa is considered to be the state’s largest untapped freshwater resource.
    All of these resources would be endangered by mining on Otero Mesa, which could cut off hunting and hiking opportunities, as well as other traditional uses of the land, and contaminate water supplies with toxic tailings. Mining on public lands is currently administered under the archaic 1872 Mining Law, in which companies pay no royalties and public lands that are mined are subject to insufficient environmental review and protections. It’s past time we stop allowing mining companies to run roughshod over our public lands and treasured landscapes. We need permanent protection for Otero Mesa now!
     
    Click here to send a free fax to President Obama, asking him to designate Otero Mesa National Monument before it’s too late.
  • Surprise encounter

  • clock ticking

  • By Edmund McWilliams/Vietnam veteran

    Ruidoso News

    11/08/2011

    While I only moved to New Mexico in 2004, my love affair with the Southwest began many years ago.

    In 1970 I volunteered for the Army and was assigned to Biggs Field outside Fort Bliss for a year of Vietnamese language training. For nearly a year, before leaving for Vietnam, some buddies and I spent most of our weekends exploring the extraordinary desert, grasslands and mountains that spread east and north of the base. The pristine beauty of the amazing west Texas and southern New Mexico landscape stayed with me through the ensuing decades and after retirement led me back to the Southwest.

    The heart of that extraordinary landscape is Otero Mesa, a nearly untouched expanse of grasslands bounded on the east by the majestic Guadalupe Mountains and on the north by the magnificent Lincoln National Forest.

    Known to many as the Serengeti of the Southwest, Otero Mesa is home to large herds of pronghorn, mule deer and rare bird species. A century ago it was the domain of the Mescalero who trekked across it from their encampments in the Sacramento Mountains. They and their predecessors from centuries before left a stunning record of their lives in rock art that embellishes Alamo and Wind mountains at the southern edge of Otero Mesa. Since returning to New Mexico I have worked with the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance in its effort to preserve this unique land against development that continues to threaten the area.

    Those who have encountered the raw beauty of Otero Mesa, experienced the massive monsoon thunder storms that sweep across it in summer or marveled at the unmatched beauty of the wildflowers that color the whole mesa in spring are determined to protect this land against oil and gas development and the emerging threat of open pit rare earth mining that continues to menace this precious place. In an all-too rare alliance, hunters, ranchers, and people who simply love nature and the history of this special place, have come together to defend Otero Mesa.

    Also since coming to New Mexico I have worked with other veterans in the area on a personal basis. Many of the veterans I have met with have shared their experiences, especially in service. Vietnam and Korea were for many hellish places with memories of combat and suffering that continue to be open wounds that limit their careers and work, their family life and of course their health.

    Sadly, the current generation of veterans now returning from Iraq and Afghanistan are even more heavily burdened, after multiple extended tours, having endured the same hellish conditions of war Vietnam or Korea era veterans faced for only one or at most two tours of duty.

    Many of these veterans have told me that they have been able to find in the Southwest, and particularly in New Mexico, the kind of inner peace and solace they could not find elsewhere in America.They have found in the incredible vistas of New Mexico’s mountain-framed horizons and the silence of its deserts, grasslands and forests a kind of harmony and order that has given them the time and space to rebuild their lives.

    This is the very specialness about New Mexico that left so strong an impression on me four decades ago.

    Too often when we consider New Mexico’s natural resources, our minds turn to the physical exploitation of that wealth. We value the land for that which lies beneath it, the oil, the gas the minerals. Or for some, it is the grassland itself whose value lies in the potential for cattle grazing or for hunting the pronghorn and mule deer herds. Even those of us fighting to preserve Otero Mesa have tended to think in such terms, arguing as we do that Otero Mesa must be preserved so as to protect the vast water aquifer that lies below it, or to attract tourist dollars to the state.

    We tend to overlook the more intrinsic value of Otero Mesa and other places of wonder that comprise our state.

    There is real value too in the simple, pristine beauty of this land, unadorned by oil rigs, open pit mining operations, or for that matter, tourist-oriented billboards. People in need of and in search for harmony in lives fractured by war, or personal tragedy, and even those for whom the pace of life at times gets to be overwhelming, understand this intrinsic value better than most. The veterans, the physically and mentally wounded or those simply seeking to re-order their lives, have a deeper insight regarding the value of this land.

    Their insight and understanding is along the lines of that offered by Henry D. Thoreau over 170 years ago. In his essay “Walking,” he wrote: “The West of which I speak is but another name for the wild; and what I have been preparing to say is, that in wildness is the preservation of the world.”

    As a veteran and newly minted New Mexican, whose love for New Mexico was inspired by Otero Mesa and who drew on memories of it for solace and strength during a tour in Vietnam and through ensuing decades, I am determined that this priceless treasure be preserved for future generations.

    Read another veteran’s perspective.

  • 2015 10 22 12 26 43

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  • 2015 10 22 12 26 43

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  • WHEN: March 30, 2011, 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM

    WHERE: UNM Bookstore (2301 Central NE), UNM School of Law (1117 Stanford NE)

    WHAT: UNM Wolf Awareness Day is a three-part event to celebrate and examine UNM’ s mascot, the Mexican gray wolf a.k.a. lobo, and the current reintroduction effort of the animal into the wild.

    Wolf Rally – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – UNM Bookstore
    UNM Wilderness Alliance (UNM Wild) and Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM) to sponsor a public rally for the five wolves illegally poached in 2010. The event will be begin at the UNM Bookstore and move to the intersection of Central St & University
    Ave. The event is open to the public and will feature UNM students and the advocacy group Great Old Broads for Wilderness.

    Panel Discussion – 3:30 PM – 6:00 PM – UNM School of Law

    UNM Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) and APNM to sponsor a panel discussion entitled The Challenge of Mexican Wolf Recovery: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives of Key Players. The panel discussion will begin at 3:30 PM with short introductory speeches by State Auditor Hector Balderas and SALDF. The panel will convene at 4 PM; confirmed as panelists are John Oakleaf of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; Justin Tade, attorney with U.S. Department of the Interior; John Horning, Executive Director of WildEarth Guardians; Michael Robinson, Conservation Advocate with Center for Biological Diversity; UNM Law professor Eileen Gauna; and UNM Communications professor Tema Milstein. The panelists will be answering a series of questions on Mexican wolf reintroduction asked by UNM students.

    Film Screening – 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM – UNM School of Law

    SALDF and APNM to sponsor a screening of two short films related to Mexican wolf reintroduction. First showing will be a debate on Mexican wolf reintroduction aired on KNME’s New Mexico In Focus on January 7, 2011, featuring John Horning and Caren Cowan of New Mexico Cattlegrowers Association. The second showing will be rare footage of the first releases of Mexican wolves into the wild in 1998/99.

    WHO:
    Student Animal Legal Defense Fund is a organization of UNM Law students with the mission of informing the law school community about current legal issues in animal rights and animal welfare law; hosting speakers and conferences; carrying out research projects for lawyers and organizations involved in animal welfare/rights litigation; and conducting educational events.

    Animal Protection of New Mexico, Inc. has been working to promote the humane treatment of animals since 1979. APNM is a non-profit, 501 (c)(3) organization supported by donations, volunteers and grants. Phil Carter, Wildlife Campaign Manager
    with APNM, is a former student and environmental organizer at UNM, working on Mexican wolf issues with UNM Wilderness Alliance, the student branch of New Mexico Wilderness Alliance.

    Contact:
    Phil Carter, Wildlife Campaign Manager, Animal Protection of New Mexico
    (505) 967-5297
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Owen Johnson, President, Student Animal Legal Defense Fund
    (801) 440-6506
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • WHEN: March 30, 2011, 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM

    WHERE: UNM Bookstore (2301 Central NE), UNM School of Law (1117 Stanford NE)

    WHAT: UNM Wolf Awareness Day is a three-part event to celebrate and examine UNM’ s mascot, the Mexican gray wolf a.k.a. lobo, and the current reintroduction effort of the animal into the wild.

    Wolf Rally – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – UNM Bookstore
    UNM Wilderness Alliance (UNM Wild) and Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM) to sponsor a public rally for the five wolves illegally poached in 2010. The event will be begin at the UNM Bookstore and move to the intersection of Central St & University
    Ave. The event is open to the public and will feature UNM students and the advocacy group Great Old Broads for Wilderness.

    Panel Discussion – 3:30 PM – 6:00 PM – UNM School of Law

    UNM Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) and APNM to sponsor a panel discussion entitled The Challenge of Mexican Wolf Recovery: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives of Key Players. The panel discussion will begin at 3:30 PM with short introductory speeches by State Auditor Hector Balderas and SALDF. The panel will convene at 4 PM; confirmed as panelists are John Oakleaf of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; Justin Tade, attorney with U.S. Department of the Interior; John Horning, Executive Director of WildEarth Guardians; Michael Robinson, Conservation Advocate with Center for Biological Diversity; UNM Law professor Eileen Gauna; and UNM Communications professor Tema Milstein. The panelists will be answering a series of questions on Mexican wolf reintroduction asked by UNM students.

    Film Screening – 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM – UNM School of Law

    SALDF and APNM to sponsor a screening of two short films related to Mexican wolf reintroduction. First showing will be a debate on Mexican wolf reintroduction aired on KNME’s New Mexico In Focus on January 7, 2011, featuring John Horning and Caren Cowan of New Mexico Cattlegrowers Association. The second showing will be rare footage of the first releases of Mexican wolves into the wild in 1998/99.

    WHO:
    Student Animal Legal Defense Fund is a organization of UNM Law students with the mission of informing the law school community about current legal issues in animal rights and animal welfare law; hosting speakers and conferences; carrying out research projects for lawyers and organizations involved in animal welfare/rights litigation; and conducting educational events.

    Animal Protection of New Mexico, Inc. has been working to promote the humane treatment of animals since 1979. APNM is a non-profit, 501 (c)(3) organization supported by donations, volunteers and grants. Phil Carter, Wildlife Campaign Manager
    with APNM, is a former student and environmental organizer at UNM, working on Mexican wolf issues with UNM Wilderness Alliance, the student branch of New Mexico Wilderness Alliance.

    Contact:
    Phil Carter, Wildlife Campaign Manager, Animal Protection of New Mexico
    (505) 967-5297
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Owen Johnson, President, Student Animal Legal Defense Fund
    (801) 440-6506
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • New Budget Bill Rider Would De-List Rocky Mountain Gray Wolves: Call Congress, President Obama Today

    Later this week, Congress will vote on a six-month spending bill that contains a rider to remove Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in Idaho, Montana, Utah, and potentially Oregon and Washington.

    This budget rider would open the door for state wildlife agencies in Idaho and Montana to kill wolves on behalf of special interests. If we let Congress roll back ESA protections for gray wolves in these states, the lobos of New Mexico and Arizona will not be far behind.

    wolf 150x150It has been a long, hard fight, but please: call your Senators again. Thank them for fighting budget cuts designed to undermine environmental protections. Ask specifically that they commit to opposing anti-wolf legislation in any way they can, including voting against legislation containing riders or amendments that would delist the gray wolf.

    BINGAMAN: Tollfree in NM: 800-443-8658

    UDALL: (202) 224-6621

    Click here for legislative lookup if outside NM

    You can also contact President Obama and remind him of his own position that policy decisions should not be made through budget bills. Ask him to veto any budget bill containing any policy riders, including those that endanger wolves and the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

    White House Comments Hotline: 202-456-1111

    Thank you for your work to stop this precedent that would eliminate protections for gray wolves, weaken the ESA, and leave these magnificent animals without a safety net against the threat of widespread killing. At this crucial time for wolves and other wildlife, your actions are critical.

  • New Budget Bill Rider Would De-List Rocky Mountain Gray Wolves: Call Congress, President Obama Today

    Later this week, Congress will vote on a six-month spending bill that contains a rider to remove Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in Idaho, Montana, Utah, and potentially Oregon and Washington.

    This budget rider would open the door for state wildlife agencies in Idaho and Montana to kill wolves on behalf of special interests. If we let Congress roll back ESA protections for gray wolves in these states, the lobos of New Mexico and Arizona will not be far behind.

    wolf 150x150It has been a long, hard fight, but please: call your Senators again. Thank them for fighting budget cuts designed to undermine environmental protections. Ask specifically that they commit to opposing anti-wolf legislation in any way they can, including voting against legislation containing riders or amendments that would delist the gray wolf.

    BINGAMAN: Tollfree in NM: 800-443-8658

    UDALL: (202) 224-6621

    Click here for legislative lookup if outside NM

    You can also contact President Obama and remind him of his own position that policy decisions should not be made through budget bills. Ask him to veto any budget bill containing any policy riders, including those that endanger wolves and the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

    White House Comments Hotline: 202-456-1111

    Thank you for your work to stop this precedent that would eliminate protections for gray wolves, weaken the ESA, and leave these magnificent animals without a safety net against the threat of widespread killing. At this crucial time for wolves and other wildlife, your actions are critical.


  • Give now to ensure golden eagles soar free in Otero Mesa
    Please help us work to protect places like Otero Mesa, which the golden eagle calls home. Make a year-end tax deductible donation now.

    The golden eagle needs your help
    Help us preserve habitat for the golden eagle and other species in New Mexico. Give online now.

    golden eagle 

    Associate Director Nathan Newcomer recalls his experience with a rehabilitated golden eagle in Otero Mesa. Otero Mesa is now threatened with hardrock mining, which could compromise habitat for species including the golden eagle.

    “I remember the first time I laid eyes on him. I didn’t sense any fear—all I saw was strength and a longing to be free.

    Being as young as he was, it was surprising that he had made it this far after being struck by a car only seven months prior.

    When we took him out of the cage, his wings flew open like a theater curtain and he began to clean feathers from his body. Huge accordion-like flaps ensued for several minutes, as he tested the crisp morning air on this late September day in Otero Mesa.

    A light breeze was blowing to the north. Alamo Mountain was immediately behind us and the sun had just started to creep around the high boulders, casting a light-orange tint on the grasslands to our west.

    We all collectively held our breath as he took one final illustrious wave and then surged out of the hands of his caretaker, diving straight towards me.

    His wings engorged with the wind, he streamed higher and higher until he was flying up the slopes of Alamo.

    Free at last–this courageous golden eagle would start life over in the grasslands of Otero Mesa.

    Yet, what kind of chance will golden eagles have if hardrock mining is allowed to move forward in this wild expanse? Will the more-than 200 migratory songbirds and numerous other raptors still be able to flourish once the mining trucks move in and begin to tear down the mountains? What of the pronghorn herds, of the mule deer, the prairie dog colonies?”

    Nathan Newcomer

    Nathan Newcomer

    It is because of places like Otero Mesa that the wild spirit of freedom can still pervade. Wildness is freedom–and Otero Mesa is just simply wild. Help us keep it that way. Please give your year-end tax deductible gift now.

    Thanks to you, we’ve reached 10 percent of our goal to raise $20,000 by January 1. Please give now to help us reach our goal and protect golden eagle habitat.

    NM Wild is working to protect places such as Otero Mesa, which is home to species like the golden eagle.

    Otero Mesa is currently threatened by hardrock mining. Please help us continue to fight for animals like the golden eagle by giving to NM Wild today.

    Please visit our website at www.nmwild.org

    Donate Online

  • Help Pass S. 667/ H. 1241, the El Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act

    The Senate Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests will hold a hearing on the Act on May 18th. Send a free fax at our online action center to encourage our Congressional delegation to make passing this bill a priority!

    Sportsmen, conservationists, small business owners and citizens across New Mexico are rallying in support of S. 667 and its companion bill in the house. This legislation which would create a nearly 236,000-acre conservation area including two new wildernesses. The Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act will safeguard some of northern New Mexico’s most striking wild places, including the iconic Ute Mountain.

    Moreover, the bill supports traditional communities and cultures in Northern New Mexico. It is the first legislation to explicitly honor and acknowledge the rights of land grant communities under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, and it protects traditional harvesting and gathering practices of Native American groups.

    Voice your thanks to Senators Bingaman and Udall and Representatives Lujan and Heinrich for co-sponsoring this legislation. Show your support for protecting Northern New Mexico’s public lands. Send them a free fax at our online action center.

    For more information:
    – Read our press release
    – Read the Santa Fe New Mexican editorial

  • Help Pass S. 667/ H. 1241, the El Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act

    The Senate Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests will hold a hearing on the Act on May 18th. Send a free fax at our online action center to encourage our Congressional delegation to make passing this bill a priority!

    Sportsmen, conservationists, small business owners and citizens across New Mexico are rallying in support of S. 667 and its companion bill in the house. This legislation which would create a nearly 236,000-acre conservation area including two new wildernesses. The Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act will safeguard some of northern New Mexico’s most striking wild places, including the iconic Ute Mountain.

    Moreover, the bill supports traditional communities and cultures in Northern New Mexico. It is the first legislation to explicitly honor and acknowledge the rights of land grant communities under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, and it protects traditional harvesting and gathering practices of Native American groups.

    Voice your thanks to Senators Bingaman and Udall and Representatives Lujan and Heinrich for co-sponsoring this legislation. Show your support for protecting Northern New Mexico’s public lands. Send them a free fax at our online action center.

    For more information:
    – Read our press release
    – Read the Santa Fe New Mexican editorial

  • 150 Words from You Can Make the Difference between Extinction and Survival

    lobo 250x198Write a letter to your local papers.

    Mexican gray wolves need your help to stop Congress from taking away the safety net of the Endangered Species Act. Thanks to this important environmental law, we still have wolves in New Mexico and Arizona playing their part in the balance of nature.

    Just 50 Mexican wolves remain in the wild today. While their numbers have improved modestly in the last year, they are teetering on the brink of extinction.

    Now is not the time for Congress to remove protections for imperiled Mexican wolves and open the door for state wildlife agencies like the Arizona Game and Fish Department to kill wolves when they inconvenience livestock owners.

    Wildlife officials in Wyoming have said they would allow wolves to be shot, trapped, and poisoned on sight. The state of Idaho’s official position is that there should be zero wolves in the state. Montana wants to institute a wolf hunting season.

    If the bills introduced by Congressman Rehberg and Senator Hatch or similar bills pass, the fate of gray wolves will be decided by state agencies that say they would kill them. This is like putting banks in charge of financial reform.

    This is the greatest threat to the Mexican wolf’s survival since its first extinction in the wild around 1980, when the last seven were protected and later bred in captivity. The nearly extinct lobo was reintroduced because of the Endangered Species Act.

    That’s why people are calling these bills what they really are: wolf extinction bills.

    And they put more than wolves in peril -they threaten all wildlife and the Endangered Species Act itself. Never before has Congress stripped ESA protection from a single species – this sets a dangerous precedent to let any animal go extinct based on politics rather than the sound science the ESA requires.

    You can tell your members of Congress, your state government, and hundreds to thousands of your fellow citizens to stop wolf extinction bills with one short letter, if you send it to a newspaper.

    Surveys show that the letters page is one of the most closely read parts of the paper. It’s also the page policy-makers look to as a barometer of public opinion. If you mention AZ Game and Fish and/or Senators Kyl, McCain, Udall, and Bingaman in your letter, the agency or Senator’s staff will most likely see that letter during a regular scan of the media.

    Mexican wolves are worth writing 150 words to save. VISIT OUR ONLINE ACTION CENTER to write a letter to the editor today. Ask everyone you know to do the same.

    Letter Writing Tips & Talking Points

    This is your letter, so write in your own words, from your own experience. Below are a few suggestions for ensuring your message gets through clearly. CONTACT US if you need help writing your letter or would like someone to read it before you send it out.

    – Address a specific article, editorial or letter that recently appeared in the paper you are writing to. This can be anything about Mexican wolves, extinction legislation, the recent population count, gray wolves in general, etc. Visit our website for recent relevant news articles. Keep your letter between 150-300 words, depending on the paper’s limit.

    –  Provide your name, address and phone number; your full address and phone number will not be published, but they are required in order to have your letter published.

    – Feel free to write one letter and revise it for several papers, including papers outside where you live.

    [Alert text & talking points from Mexicanwolves.org]

  • 150 Words from You Can Make the Difference between Extinction and Survival

    lobo 250x198Write a letter to your local papers.

    Mexican gray wolves need your help to stop Congress from taking away the safety net of the Endangered Species Act. Thanks to this important environmental law, we still have wolves in New Mexico and Arizona playing their part in the balance of nature.

    Just 50 Mexican wolves remain in the wild today. While their numbers have improved modestly in the last year, they are teetering on the brink of extinction.

    Now is not the time for Congress to remove protections for imperiled Mexican wolves and open the door for state wildlife agencies like the Arizona Game and Fish Department to kill wolves when they inconvenience livestock owners.

    Wildlife officials in Wyoming have said they would allow wolves to be shot, trapped, and poisoned on sight. The state of Idaho’s official position is that there should be zero wolves in the state. Montana wants to institute a wolf hunting season.

    If the bills introduced by Congressman Rehberg and Senator Hatch or similar bills pass, the fate of gray wolves will be decided by state agencies that say they would kill them. This is like putting banks in charge of financial reform.

    This is the greatest threat to the Mexican wolf’s survival since its first extinction in the wild around 1980, when the last seven were protected and later bred in captivity. The nearly extinct lobo was reintroduced because of the Endangered Species Act.

    That’s why people are calling these bills what they really are: wolf extinction bills.

    And they put more than wolves in peril -they threaten all wildlife and the Endangered Species Act itself. Never before has Congress stripped ESA protection from a single species – this sets a dangerous precedent to let any animal go extinct based on politics rather than the sound science the ESA requires.

    You can tell your members of Congress, your state government, and hundreds to thousands of your fellow citizens to stop wolf extinction bills with one short letter, if you send it to a newspaper.

    Surveys show that the letters page is one of the most closely read parts of the paper. It’s also the page policy-makers look to as a barometer of public opinion. If you mention AZ Game and Fish and/or Senators Kyl, McCain, Udall, and Bingaman in your letter, the agency or Senator’s staff will most likely see that letter during a regular scan of the media.

    Mexican wolves are worth writing 150 words to save. VISIT OUR ONLINE ACTION CENTER to write a letter to the editor today. Ask everyone you know to do the same.

    Letter Writing Tips & Talking Points

    This is your letter, so write in your own words, from your own experience. Below are a few suggestions for ensuring your message gets through clearly. CONTACT US if you need help writing your letter or would like someone to read it before you send it out.

    – Address a specific article, editorial or letter that recently appeared in the paper you are writing to. This can be anything about Mexican wolves, extinction legislation, the recent population count, gray wolves in general, etc. Visit our website for recent relevant news articles. Keep your letter between 150-300 words, depending on the paper’s limit.

    –  Provide your name, address and phone number; your full address and phone number will not be published, but they are required in order to have your letter published.

    – Feel free to write one letter and revise it for several papers, including papers outside where you live.

    [Alert text & talking points from Mexicanwolves.org]

  • El Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act Reintroduced!

    Sportsmen, conservationists, small business owners and citizens across New Mexico are celebrating Senator Bingaman’s reintroduction of a bill to create a nearly 236,000-acre conservation area including two new wildernesses. The Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act will safeguard some of northern New Mexico’s most striking wild places, including the iconic Ute Mountain.

    Voice your thanks to Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this bill, and show your support for protecting Northern New Mexico’s public lands:  write a letter to the editor today. 

    Your letters are powerful tools, reaching your elected officials and educating up to thousands of voters!

    Use the following links to write newspapers in Northern New Mexico, applauding Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this legislation and cheering on his efforts to pass the bill. Be sure to write the Santa Fe New Mexican supporting their recent editoral in favor of the bill:

    Las Vegas Optic
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 2670
    614 Lincoln St
    Las Vegas, NM 87701
    (250 word limit)

    Santa Fe New Mexican
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 2048
    Santa Fe, NM 87504-2048
    (150 word limit)

    Taos News 
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 3737
    Taos, NM 87571
    (250 word limit)

    Albuquerque Journal
    Submit Letter Online
    7777 Jefferson Street NE
    Albuquerque, N.M., 87109

    For more information:

    – Read our press release
    – Read the Santa Fe New Mexican editorial

    Talking points:

    – Be sure to thank Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this bill, which is the product of years of community collaboration and grassroots support. You can also thank Congressmen Ben Ray Lujan and Martin Heinrich for introducing companion legislation in the House.
    – The 236,000-acre El Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area, along with the Cerro del Yuta and Rio San Antonio Wilderness Areas proposed in the bill would protect the groundwater resources of Northern New Mexico, and safeguard hunting, fishing, gathering and recreational opportunities vital to the economy of Northern New Mexico communities.
    – The bill would permanently protect key wildlife habitat;’ the region contains key breeding and feeding grounds and is part of a major migratory flyway for many bird species.
    – This legislation is supported by diverse stakeholders including hunters, anglers, conservationists, local businesses, local government officials, and thousands of Northern New Mexicans.
    – Traditional communities and land uses are honored and protected in this landmark legislation, which recognizes the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
    – This bill would create the largest continuous protected public property in northern New Mexico.

  • El Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act Reintroduced!

    Sportsmen, conservationists, small business owners and citizens across New Mexico are celebrating Senator Bingaman’s reintroduction of a bill to create a nearly 236,000-acre conservation area including two new wildernesses. The Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act will safeguard some of northern New Mexico’s most striking wild places, including the iconic Ute Mountain.

    Voice your thanks to Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this bill, and show your support for protecting Northern New Mexico’s public lands:  write a letter to the editor today. 

    Your letters are powerful tools, reaching your elected officials and educating up to thousands of voters!

    Use the following links to write newspapers in Northern New Mexico, applauding Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this legislation and cheering on his efforts to pass the bill. Be sure to write the Santa Fe New Mexican supporting their recent editoral in favor of the bill:

    Las Vegas Optic
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 2670
    614 Lincoln St
    Las Vegas, NM 87701
    (250 word limit)

    Santa Fe New Mexican
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 2048
    Santa Fe, NM 87504-2048
    (150 word limit)

    Taos News 
    Submit Letter Online
    P.O. Box 3737
    Taos, NM 87571
    (250 word limit)

    Albuquerque Journal
    Submit Letter Online
    7777 Jefferson Street NE
    Albuquerque, N.M., 87109

    For more information:

    – Read our press release
    – Read the Santa Fe New Mexican editorial

    Talking points:

    – Be sure to thank Senator Bingaman for reintroducing this bill, which is the product of years of community collaboration and grassroots support. You can also thank Congressmen Ben Ray Lujan and Martin Heinrich for introducing companion legislation in the House.
    – The 236,000-acre El Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area, along with the Cerro del Yuta and Rio San Antonio Wilderness Areas proposed in the bill would protect the groundwater resources of Northern New Mexico, and safeguard hunting, fishing, gathering and recreational opportunities vital to the economy of Northern New Mexico communities.
    – The bill would permanently protect key wildlife habitat;’ the region contains key breeding and feeding grounds and is part of a major migratory flyway for many bird species.
    – This legislation is supported by diverse stakeholders including hunters, anglers, conservationists, local businesses, local government officials, and thousands of Northern New Mexicans.
    – Traditional communities and land uses are honored and protected in this landmark legislation, which recognizes the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
    – This bill would create the largest continuous protected public property in northern New Mexico.

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