2012

  • 18 million gallons of water at stake

    spring 2012 fundraiser otero banner copy

    fundraiser thermometer 18 187x250Since 2001, we have been hard at work protecting Otero Mesa in southern New Mexico from development. You may have read about our ongoing work to protect the landscape of this desert grassland and its abundant wildlife. 

    However, Otero Mesa also offers an important natural resource that we all need to live—water.Otero Mesa lies atop New Mexico’s largest untapped freshwater aquifer, the Salt Basin. As the effects of global warming such as drought take hold in the coming years, this aquifer could be the key to survival in towns surrounding Otero Mesa such as Alamogordo.

    Please donate online now to help us protect Otero Mesa’s groundwater and the communities, wildlife and landscapes that depend on it.

    The Salt Basin Aquifer boasts at least 57 million cubic feet of water under Otero Mesa. That’s more than 18 million gallons of potable drinking waterenough to supply a city of 1 million people for almost 150 years.However, Otero Mesa is currently threatened by development. In the past, NM Wild has fought (and won) against oil and gas development in Otero Mesa. Now the threat is hardrock mining. Denver-based Geovic Mining Corp is the lead company seeking to mine for zirconium and other rare earth minerals in Otero Mesa. This type of mining operation could destroy Otero Mesa’s rare and fragile ecosystem, and could severely damage underground aquifers in the region.

    Please help us fight for Otero Mesa and all that it protects including clean, safe drinking water, by donating online today.


    Thank you in advance for your support,

    Stephen Capra

    Executive Director

    Donate Online

  • 18 million gallons of water at stake

    spring 2012 fundraiser otero banner copy

    fundraiser thermometer 18 187x250Since 2001, we have been hard at work protecting Otero Mesa in southern New Mexico from development. You may have read about our ongoing work to protect the landscape of this desert grassland and its abundant wildlife. 

    However, Otero Mesa also offers an important natural resource that we all need to live—water.Otero Mesa lies atop New Mexico’s largest untapped freshwater aquifer, the Salt Basin. As the effects of global warming such as drought take hold in the coming years, this aquifer could be the key to survival in towns surrounding Otero Mesa such as Alamogordo.

    Please donate online now to help us protect Otero Mesa’s groundwater and the communities, wildlife and landscapes that depend on it.

    The Salt Basin Aquifer boasts at least 57 million cubic feet of water under Otero Mesa. That’s more than 18 million gallons of potable drinking waterenough to supply a city of 1 million people for almost 150 years.However, Otero Mesa is currently threatened by development. In the past, NM Wild has fought (and won) against oil and gas development in Otero Mesa. Now the threat is hardrock mining. Denver-based Geovic Mining Corp is the lead company seeking to mine for zirconium and other rare earth minerals in Otero Mesa. This type of mining operation could destroy Otero Mesa’s rare and fragile ecosystem, and could severely damage underground aquifers in the region.

    Please help us fight for Otero Mesa and all that it protects including clean, safe drinking water, by donating online today.


    Thank you in advance for your support,

    Stephen Capra

    Executive Director

    Donate Online

  • 1872 Mining Law

    he mining of hardrock minerals—gold, uranium and other metals—on public lands is governed today by a law that has changed little since it was first signed by Ulysses S. Grant. The General Mining Law of 1872 was enacted to promote mineral exploration and development in the western United States. Download the briefing paper.

  • 1872 Mining Law Reform

    The mining of hardrock minerals—gold, uranium and other metals—on public lands is governed today by a law that has changed little since it was first signed by Ulysses S. Grant. The General Mining Law of 1872 was enacted to promote mineral exploration and development in the western United States. Download the briefing paper.

  • 2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released

    For Immediate Release
    March 1, 2012

    2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released
    Second annual commemorative stamp supports Mexican gray wolf conservation

    2012 Wolf Stamp copyAlbuquerque, N.M.— February 9, 2012—The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) just released its 2012 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.

    “The wolf stamp is designed to build support for wolves by donating directly to smaller groups or individuals that are working to make wolf recovery possible,” said NM Wild Executive Director Stephen Capra. “Our goal is wolves on the ground — healthy and vibrant. The wolf stamp is an important tool in reaching that goal.

    The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color commemorative conservation stamp is similar to the Federal Duck Stamp—proceeds from the wolf stamp go into the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Fund, administered by NM Wild and distributed through a grant to individuals and organizations working for Mexican gray wolf recovery. This year’s grant recipient is the Mexican conservation group, Naturalia, which recently released several Mexican gray wolves in northern Mexico.

    The Mexican gray wolf is the most endangered wolf in the world, with a total population of fewer than 50 in the wild.

    The 2012 stamp is the second in a series of framing-quality art prints offered to collectors. This year’s stamp was designed by artist Catherine Howell.

    The stamp is available for $20 plus shipping on the NM Wild website: www.nmwild.org. To purchase a wolf stamp, go to Shop, and click Stock up on posters, wolf stamps and more!

    Last year’s stamp was designed by New Mexico artist Virginia Maria Romero, with proceeds going to Elke Duerr for her wolf education and outreach efforts.

    Contact:
    Tina Deines
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    ###
    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is a non-profit 501(C)(3), grassroots, environmental organization dedicated to the protection, restoration, and continued enjoyment of New Mexico’s wildlands and Wilderness areas. The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy.

  • 2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released

    For Immediate Release
    March 1, 2012

    2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released
    Second annual commemorative stamp supports Mexican gray wolf conservation

    2012 Wolf Stamp copyAlbuquerque, N.M.— February 9, 2012—The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) just released its 2012 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.

    “The wolf stamp is designed to build support for wolves by donating directly to smaller groups or individuals that are working to make wolf recovery possible,” said NM Wild Executive Director Stephen Capra. “Our goal is wolves on the ground — healthy and vibrant. The wolf stamp is an important tool in reaching that goal.

    The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color commemorative conservation stamp is similar to the Federal Duck Stamp—proceeds from the wolf stamp go into the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Fund, administered by NM Wild and distributed through a grant to individuals and organizations working for Mexican gray wolf recovery. This year’s grant recipient is the Mexican conservation group, Naturalia, which recently released several Mexican gray wolves in northern Mexico.

    The Mexican gray wolf is the most endangered wolf in the world, with a total population of fewer than 50 in the wild.

    The 2012 stamp is the second in a series of framing-quality art prints offered to collectors. This year’s stamp was designed by artist Catherine Howell.

    The stamp is available for $20 plus shipping on the NM Wild website: www.nmwild.org. To purchase a wolf stamp, go to Shop, and click Stock up on posters, wolf stamps and more!

    Last year’s stamp was designed by New Mexico artist Virginia Maria Romero, with proceeds going to Elke Duerr for her wolf education and outreach efforts.

    Contact:
    Tina Deines
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    ###
    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is a non-profit 501(C)(3), grassroots, environmental organization dedicated to the protection, restoration, and continued enjoyment of New Mexico’s wildlands and Wilderness areas. The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy.

  • 2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released

    For Immediate Release

    2012 Limited Edition Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Released
    Second annual commemorative stamp supports Mexican gray wolf conservation

    2012 Wolf Stamp copy 191x250Albuquerque, N.M.— February 9, 2012—The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) just released its 2012 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.

    “The wolf stamp is designed to build support for wolves by donating directly to smaller groups or individuals that are working to make wolf recovery possible,” said NM Wild Executive Director Stephen Capra. “Our goal is wolves on the ground— healthy and vibrant. The wolf stamp is an important tool in reaching that goal.

    The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color commemorative conservation stamp is similar to the Federal Duck Stamp—proceeds from the wolf stamp go into the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Fund, administered by NM Wild and distributed through a grant to individuals and organizations working for Mexican gray wolf recovery. This year’s grant recipient is the Mexican conservation group, Naturalia, which recently released several Mexican gray wolves in northern Mexico.

    The Mexican gray wolf is the most endangered wolf in the world, with a total population of fewer than 50 in the wild.

    The 2012 stamp is the second in a series of framing-quality art prints offered to collectors. This year’s stamp was designed by artist Catherine Howell.

    The stamp is available for $20 plus shipping on the NM Wild website: www.nmwild.org. To purchase a wolf stamp, go to Shop, and click Stock up on posters, wolf stamps and more!

    Last year’s stamp was designed by New Mexico artist Virginia Maria Romero, with proceeds going to Elke Duerr for her wolf education and outreach efforts.

    Contact:
    Tina Deines
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    ###

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is a non-profit 501(C)(3), grassroots, environmental organization dedicated to the protection, restoration, and continued enjoyment of New Mexico’s wildlands and Wilderness areas. The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy.

     

  • 2012 Wolf Stamp Artwork Chosen-Wilderness Weekly January 26, 2012

    jan 26 weekly

  • 2013 Wolf Stamp Call for Entries

    2012 Wolf Stamp copyThe New Mexico Wilderness Alliance invites submissions for the 2013 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp. Artists worldwide are invited to enter two-dimensional drawings, paintings, or photographs featuring the Mexican gray wolf.  The winning artwork will be featured on the 2013 stamp that will be sold to raise funds to support Mexican wolf conservation projects and educate the public.  All artwork must be scalable to the size of the stamp, 4-inches wide by 5-inches tall. Artwork will not be returned unless self addressed envelope with postage is provided.  Please submit entries by December 31, 2012, to New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Fund, PO Box 25464, Albuquerque, NM 87125 or e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Scans or high resolution photographs of the original artwork can be submitted via e*mail.

  • 2013 Wolf Stamp Call for Entries

    2012 Wolf Stamp copyThe New Mexico Wilderness Alliance invites submissions for the 2013 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp. Artists worldwide are invited to enter two-dimensional drawings, paintings, or photographs featuring the Mexican gray wolf.  The winning artwork will be featured on the 2013 stamp that will be sold to raise funds to support Mexican wolf conservation projects and educate the public.  All artwork must be scalable to the size of the stamp, 4-inches wide by 5-inches tall. Artwork will not be returned unless self addressed envelope with postage is provided.  Please submit entries by December 31, 2012, to New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp Fund, PO Box 25464, Albuquerque, NM 87125 or e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Scans or high resolution photographs of the original artwork can be submitted via e*mail.

  • A Río Grande del Norte national monument makes economic sense

    November 21, 2012

    The Taos News

    The north central part of New Mexico thrives on the beauty of the land. It sustains our culture and way of life. Business owners in this area are more aware than ever of how important it is that people experience the mountains, waters and wildlife that make Northern New Mexico so special.

    Just 30 miles northwest of Taos, there is another treasure: Río Grande del Norte. This area has long been known for the awe-inspiring Río Grande Gorge, the soaring Ute Mountain and the vibrant Taos Plateau.

    Today, I support the movement to ask President Obama to protect this special place by designating it as Río Grande del Norte National Monument.

    Río Grande del Norte offers exceptional outdoor recreation opportunities. People near and far come to Río Grande del Norte to hike, swim, paddle, camp, bike, horseback ride, fish and hunt. Río Grande del Norte serves as a nesting ground and migratory route for a variety of bird species, such as wild geese, sandhill cranes, golden eagles and peregrine falcons. It is also home to bighorn and pronghorn sheep, elk and deer. The animals and people alike benefit from the clean water that stems from the Río Grande, providing acequias and farmers with needed water supplies.

    It is for all these incredible resources that Northern New Mexicans from all walks of like are working together to protect Río Grande del Norte. Over 100 businesses, in addition to the Taos County and Mora Valley Chambers of Commerce, sportsmen, ranchers, the Taos Town Council and Taos County Commission, members of local traditional communities and local, state and federal elected officials are searching for a way to protect this treasure in Northern New Mexico.

    Northern New Mexicans are asking for a Río Grande del Norte National Monument because it makes economic sense. According to a recent study by an economic research firm, a national monument could add $15 million annually to our local economy and create 279 jobs. This growth is on top of the $3.8 billion that outdoor recreation already contributes to New Mexico’s economy annually and the 47,000 New Mexico jobs it supports.

    Senators. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall and Reps. Ben Ray Luján and Martin Heinrich have been working on legislation to protect Río Grande del Norte. However, the bills are stalled in Congress, so our elected officials have asked President Obama to protect the area by using the Antiquities Act.

    The president of the United States can protect special natural and cultural places with the Antiquities Act, a law that is over 100 years old. American icons, like the Statue of Liberty and the Grand Canyon, have been protected by the Antiquities Act, as have the Aztec Ruins and Bandelier National Monuments right here in New Mexico.

    People come to Northern New Mexico to experience all that our great outdoors have to offer. Making sure that Río Grande del Norte is protected as a national monument would only increase the value of our land, boost our local economy, and protect our home for future generations to enjoy.

    Adriana Blake is the administrative manager at Taos Ski Valley and treasurer of the Taos County Chamber of Commerce

  • A Río Grande del Norte national monument makes economic sense

    November 21, 2012

    The Taos News

    The north central part of New Mexico thrives on the beauty of the land. It sustains our culture and way of life. Business owners in this area are more aware than ever of how important it is that people experience the mountains, waters and wildlife that make Northern New Mexico so special.

    Just 30 miles northwest of Taos, there is another treasure: Río Grande del Norte. This area has long been known for the awe-inspiring Río Grande Gorge, the soaring Ute Mountain and the vibrant Taos Plateau.

    Today, I support the movement to ask President Obama to protect this special place by designating it as Río Grande del Norte National Monument.

    Río Grande del Norte offers exceptional outdoor recreation opportunities. People near and far come to Río Grande del Norte to hike, swim, paddle, camp, bike, horseback ride, fish and hunt. Río Grande del Norte serves as a nesting ground and migratory route for a variety of bird species, such as wild geese, sandhill cranes, golden eagles and peregrine falcons. It is also home to bighorn and pronghorn sheep, elk and deer. The animals and people alike benefit from the clean water that stems from the Río Grande, providing acequias and farmers with needed water supplies.

    It is for all these incredible resources that Northern New Mexicans from all walks of like are working together to protect Río Grande del Norte. Over 100 businesses, in addition to the Taos County and Mora Valley Chambers of Commerce, sportsmen, ranchers, the Taos Town Council and Taos County Commission, members of local traditional communities and local, state and federal elected officials are searching for a way to protect this treasure in Northern New Mexico.

    Northern New Mexicans are asking for a Río Grande del Norte National Monument because it makes economic sense. According to a recent study by an economic research firm, a national monument could add $15 million annually to our local economy and create 279 jobs. This growth is on top of the $3.8 billion that outdoor recreation already contributes to New Mexico’s economy annually and the 47,000 New Mexico jobs it supports.

    Senators. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall and Reps. Ben Ray Luján and Martin Heinrich have been working on legislation to protect Río Grande del Norte. However, the bills are stalled in Congress, so our elected officials have asked President Obama to protect the area by using the Antiquities Act.

    The president of the United States can protect special natural and cultural places with the Antiquities Act, a law that is over 100 years old. American icons, like the Statue of Liberty and the Grand Canyon, have been protected by the Antiquities Act, as have the Aztec Ruins and Bandelier National Monuments right here in New Mexico.

    People come to Northern New Mexico to experience all that our great outdoors have to offer. Making sure that Río Grande del Norte is protected as a national monument would only increase the value of our land, boost our local economy, and protect our home for future generations to enjoy.

    Adriana Blake is the administrative manager at Taos Ski Valley and treasurer of the Taos County Chamber of Commerce

  • A round of applause for our members! Wilderness Weekly May 30

    a round

     

  • About “Wild Harmonies” pianist Hélène Grimaud

    Hélène Grimaud

    Read a New York Times article about Grimaud. 

    Interview with Grimaud

    A trulyhelene grimaud 248x250 multi-faceted and charismatic artist – for pianist Hélène Grimaud music is a limitless passion. Hélène regularly appears with the most important orchestras in the world, playing with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Philharmonia Orchestra and Münchner Philharmoniker, as well as all the great orchestras in North America. She has performed with three generations of conductors, including Kurt Masur, Bernard Haitink, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Neeme Järvi, Pierre Boulez, Ricardo Chailly, Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Jurowski, Fabio Luisi and Andris Nelsons. She was soloist at the Last Night of the BBC Proms 2008.

    An ardent and committed chamber musician, Hélène Grimaud performs regularly in the most prestigious festivals and cultural capitals with a wide range of collaborators including Thomas Quasthoff, Rolando Villazòn, Jan Vogler, Truls Mørk, Clemens Hagen and the Capuçon brothers. In 2009 she performed hugely successful debut recitals in China and Korea and further concerts in Europe. In 2010 she appeared as Artiste Etoile in four concerts at the Lucerne Festival. An international recital tour encompassing Europe, USA and Japan dominated her 2010/11 season with repertoire ranging from Mozart to Bartòk whilst highlights of the 2011/12 season included a five concert residency in Paris, performances of Brahms Piano Concerto No.1 with the Bayersichen Rundfunk Symphonieorchester and Andris Nelsons and a major European tour performing Ravel Piano Concerto in G with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and Riccardo Chailly.

    Highlights this autumn include the opening gala concert at Norway’s new concert hall in Stavanger and performances with both the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra in September; solo recitals in Washington, Seattle and Los Angeles; duo recitals with cellist Jan Vogler in Brussels and New York (a wolf center benefit gala) and a European tour with the Vienna Philharmonic and Yannick Nézet-Séguin in November performing Brahms Piano Concerto no.2 with concerts in Munich, Paris and Vienna. In December Hélène Grimaud tours with Sol Gabetta to Baden Baden, Lyon, Berlin, Duisburg, Hamburg, Bremen and Bern performing repertoire featured on their new joint album released by Deutsche Grammophon in October.

    An exclusive Deutsche Grammophon artist since 2002, Hélène is one of DG’s most important recording artists with a string of imaginative and highly successful discs. This autumn she releases her “Duo” album with Sol Gabetta featuring the cello sonatas of Schumann, Brahms, Shostakovich and Debussy, recreating the programme of a concert the two artists performed together at the 2011 Gstaad Festival and which the Berner Zeitung described as “Breathtaking”. Her recent 2011 release, Mozart ‘s Piano Concertos No.19 and No.23 with Kammerorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks also featured a collaboration with singer Mojca Erdmann on a recording of Mozart’s ’Ch’io mi scordi di te? KV 505’ whilst her 2010 release, the solo recital album Resonances, featured music by Mozart, Berg, Liszt and Bartok. Previous DG recordings include Bach’s solo and concerto works in which she directed Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen from the keyboard, and a Beethoven disc with Staatskapelle Dresden and Vladimir Jurowski, ‘Reflection’ and ‘Credo’ (both of which feature a number of works linked thematically), and a Chopin and Rachmaninov Sonatas disc. Hélène also features on two recent DVD releases: 2010 ECHOKlassik award winning DVD of Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto with Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, and Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G major with Vladimir Jurowski and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.

    Recipient of numerous awards worldwide, Hélène Grimaud received the 2012 Preis der Dresdner Musikfestspiele and in 2009 the Musikfest Bremen Award. She has been appointed ‘Officier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres’ by the French Ministère de la Culture in 2002 and ‘Chevalier dans l’Ordre National du Mérite’ in 2008. In 2004 she received a ‘Victoire d’honneur’ at the Victoires de la Musique and in 2005 she won the ECHO ‘Instrumentalist of the Year’ Award. Author of two very successful books, “Variations Sauvages” and “Leçons Particulières”, she champions many charitable causes, including the Wolf Conservation Center which she founded in upper New York State in 1999, the International Children’s Camp Villa San Souci, the Worldwide Fund for Nature and Amnesty International.

  • About “Wild Harmonies” pianist Hélène Grimaud

    Hélène Grimaud

    Read a New York Times article about Grimaud. 

    Interview with Grimaud

    A trulyhelene grimaud 248x250 multi-faceted and charismatic artist – for pianist Hélène Grimaud music is a limitless passion. Hélène regularly appears with the most important orchestras in the world, playing with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Philharmonia Orchestra and Münchner Philharmoniker, as well as all the great orchestras in North America. She has performed with three generations of conductors, including Kurt Masur, Bernard Haitink, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Neeme Järvi, Pierre Boulez, Ricardo Chailly, Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Jurowski, Fabio Luisi and Andris Nelsons. She was soloist at the Last Night of the BBC Proms 2008.

    An ardent and committed chamber musician, Hélène Grimaud performs regularly in the most prestigious festivals and cultural capitals with a wide range of collaborators including Thomas Quasthoff, Rolando Villazòn, Jan Vogler, Truls Mørk, Clemens Hagen and the Capuçon brothers. In 2009 she performed hugely successful debut recitals in China and Korea and further concerts in Europe. In 2010 she appeared as Artiste Etoile in four concerts at the Lucerne Festival. An international recital tour encompassing Europe, USA and Japan dominated her 2010/11 season with repertoire ranging from Mozart to Bartòk whilst highlights of the 2011/12 season included a five concert residency in Paris, performances of Brahms Piano Concerto No.1 with the Bayersichen Rundfunk Symphonieorchester and Andris Nelsons and a major European tour performing Ravel Piano Concerto in G with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and Riccardo Chailly.

    Highlights this autumn include the opening gala concert at Norway’s new concert hall in Stavanger and performances with both the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra in September; solo recitals in Washington, Seattle and Los Angeles; duo recitals with cellist Jan Vogler in Brussels and New York (a wolf center benefit gala) and a European tour with the Vienna Philharmonic and Yannick Nézet-Séguin in November performing Brahms Piano Concerto no.2 with concerts in Munich, Paris and Vienna. In December Hélène Grimaud tours with Sol Gabetta to Baden Baden, Lyon, Berlin, Duisburg, Hamburg, Bremen and Bern performing repertoire featured on their new joint album released by Deutsche Grammophon in October.

    An exclusive Deutsche Grammophon artist since 2002, Hélène is one of DG’s most important recording artists with a string of imaginative and highly successful discs. This autumn she releases her “Duo” album with Sol Gabetta featuring the cello sonatas of Schumann, Brahms, Shostakovich and Debussy, recreating the programme of a concert the two artists performed together at the 2011 Gstaad Festival and which the Berner Zeitung described as “Breathtaking”. Her recent 2011 release, Mozart ‘s Piano Concertos No.19 and No.23 with Kammerorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks also featured a collaboration with singer Mojca Erdmann on a recording of Mozart’s ’Ch’io mi scordi di te? KV 505’ whilst her 2010 release, the solo recital album Resonances, featured music by Mozart, Berg, Liszt and Bartok. Previous DG recordings include Bach’s solo and concerto works in which she directed Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen from the keyboard, and a Beethoven disc with Staatskapelle Dresden and Vladimir Jurowski, ‘Reflection’ and ‘Credo’ (both of which feature a number of works linked thematically), and a Chopin and Rachmaninov Sonatas disc. Hélène also features on two recent DVD releases: 2010 ECHOKlassik award winning DVD of Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto with Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, and Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G major with Vladimir Jurowski and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.

    Recipient of numerous awards worldwide, Hélène Grimaud received the 2012 Preis der Dresdner Musikfestspiele and in 2009 the Musikfest Bremen Award. She has been appointed ‘Officier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres’ by the French Ministère de la Culture in 2002 and ‘Chevalier dans l’Ordre National du Mérite’ in 2008. In 2004 she received a ‘Victoire d’honneur’ at the Victoires de la Musique and in 2005 she won the ECHO ‘Instrumentalist of the Year’ Award. Author of two very successful books, “Variations Sauvages” and “Leçons Particulières”, she champions many charitable causes, including the Wolf Conservation Center which she founded in upper New York State in 1999, the International Children’s Camp Villa San Souci, the Worldwide Fund for Nature and Amnesty International.

  • ACTION: Ask USFWS to release more wolves now!

    Dear Friend of Lobos,wolf and pups with donate

    In August, we asked our members to call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to help save the alpha female of the Fox Mountain pack in New Mexico. The USFWS originally had plans to kill her because of some cattle predation on her part. Through our combined efforts, we saved her from being killed.

    While the USFWS and members of Congress heard our strong call and did not kill the Fox Mountain Pack Mexican wolf mother, she was recently captured and will live in captivity permanently.

    Wolves are social animals that rely on family members in hunting and pup rearing.  Trapping or darting this wolf, and removing her forever, will disrupt the pack as well as bring us back to the policy of scapegoating wolves who occasionally prey on livestock — even when, as in this instance, the stock-owner is reimbursed.

    At last count, just 57 wolves including six breeding pairs survive in the wild.  In addition to the 12 wolves shot by the government thus far since reintroduction in 1998, 18 were killed as a consequence of capture, and up to 23 remain in captivity indefinitely; at least nine others have died of age-related ailments years after their capture.

    The Fish and Wildlife Service is rightfully concerned that the two breeding adults of the Fox Mountain pack are cousins. The solution to the problem of two closely related animals breeding is obvious-the service must release many new wolves to the wild. That way, when the pups grow up, they will be able to find unrelated mates and raise a family.  No new wolf has been released from captivity since November 2008!

    Now is the time to once again help this lobo family and not let federal bureaucrats set back Mexican wolf recovery as they have done numerous times before.

    Please call the White House, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and your members of congress and tell them to prevent a second extinction of Mexican wolves! Join others in calling for the release of more wolves into the wild. We urge you to contact your public officials every month until there is a policy change.

    White House number: 202-456-1111
    USFWS in Washington, DC Public number: 1-800-344-9453
    USFWS Southwest Regional Office External Affairs Office: 505-248-6911 (other numbers are 505-761-4748 or 505-363-2797)
    Your Congressional representatives (click here to find numbers)
    Your Senators (click here to find numbers)

    Phone calls usually carry more weight than emails.

    Letters to the editor responding to multiple articles about this issue are needed as well. Go here for more information.

    THANK YOU FOR CARING ABOUT MEXICAN WOLVES AND TAKING ACTION!!!

    Learn more about what we’re doing for Mexican gray wolves and look for our special wolf newsletter next month. You can also help by giving online.

     

  • All terrain vehicles as a cause of fire ignition in Alberta forests

    This study was initiated upon the request of Alberta Environmental Protection to investigate the relationship between all terrain vehicle (ATVs) and fire ignition within Alberta’s forests. The report summarizes the use of ATVs in Alberta and the specific causes of wildfires associated with these vehicles, describes fire history from 1990 to 2002, reports on other agencies’ strategies to lower the probability of ATV-caused fires in forested areas, and makes recommendations for Alberta.

    Download full document

  • Alliance hike highlights Columbine-Hondo area near Taos

    August 8, 2012 
    Matthew van Buren, The Taos News

    A small group of hikers headed up Columbine Canyon July 21 with further protection for the area in mind.

    The trail, which heads south from Columbine Canyon on State Highway 38, lies within the approximately 45,000-acre Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area. It has held “wilderness study area” status for about three decades, and local groups have been seeking permanent protection for the Columbine-Hondo.

    To help further that goal, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance organizer John Olivas has been arranging hikes into the Wilderness Study Area for the past several years.

    Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, introduced legislation earlier this year to bring full-fledged wilderness status to the Columbine-Hondo. The Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    A half-dozen people joined Olivas July 21 for a hike up Columbine Creek. The trail led to the beginning of a series of high alpine meadows and entailed a six-mile round trip. Over the three-mile trip in, the trail rose moderately a total of about 1,000 vertical feet. Though the trail crosses Columbine Creek at various spots, several nice bridges extend over the wider crossings.

    The group hiked through primarily spruce and aspen forest, though cottonwoods and Ponderosa pines are present at times. Wildflowers and wild raspberries grow along the trail. Butterflies were a common sight, and the group came upon a family of grouse at one point along the trail.

    After a brief hike up Columbine Creek, a side trail leads up a rock pile on the left to the site of an old mine. A round entrance leads into a straight tunnel; members of the Wilderness Alliance hike explored it to its terminus, looking at the flaky minerals and calcium deposits that lined its walls. It is a good idea to bring a flashlight or headlamp. An archaeologist with Carson National Forest said the mine is not identified in the materials she uses and could not provide further information about its history.

    The Columbine Creek Trail is among the most moderate in the steep, rugged Columbine-Hondo. It is well-maintained and rises mildly from the Columbine Campground, at about 8,000 feet in elevation. However, it steepens as it goes deeper into the Wilderness Study Area.

    After about two miles on the Columbine Creek Trail, the Deer Creek Trail breaks off to the left, and the Columbine-Hondo National Recreation Trail follows it over Gold Hill, at about 12,700 feet in altitude, and down Long Canyon to Taos Ski Valley. Those who continue to follow Columbine Creek past its intersection with the Deer Creek Trail will find another split in the trail after about half a mile. A sign on the left points to the Placer Fork Trail, which also leads toward Gold Hill. About 1.5 miles down the Placer Fork Trail, the Willow Fork Trail splits off to the right; Willow Fork leads to the Lobo Peak Ridge, just below Gold Hill.

    After the Placer Fork split, the Columbine Creek Trail continues about two miles until the Cow Lake Trail meets it on the right. Rivers and Birds Executive Director Roberta Salazar said she tried to follow it a couple of years ago and found it to be overgrown.

    After 1.5 more miles, the Columbine Creek Trail hits the ridge that runs between Lobo Peak and Gold Hill. Here the Gavilan Trail — a steep, 2.5-mile-long stretch — meets the Columbine Creek Trail and leads down to State Road 150 just outside Taos Ski Valley.

    Multiple maps of the Columbine-Hondo can be purchased locally. The Carson National Forest field office on Cruz Alta Road offers the Forest Service’s map of the Wheeler Peak and Latir Peak wildernesses, which includes the Columbine-Hondo; and a map by Dharma Maps of the Taos Wild Rivers area also includes the Columbine-Hondo and can be purchased at Mudd ’N’ Flood on Bent Street.

    The Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition touts the wide support full wilderness protection of the area has received, including from local governments, Taos Pueblo, recreationalists, ranchers and the Taos Cycling Coalition, which can be reached through its website, www.taoscycling coalition.org. Though bicycles will not be allowed on trails, such as Long Canyon, in the Columbine-Hondo area, new cycling trails will be created by a Wheeler Peak boundary modification that is included in the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act. The Act also allows traditional uses, such as grazing, to continue in the Columbine-Hondo.

    For more information about the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition, visit www.columbinehondo.org. More can be found about the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance at www.nmwild.org.

  • Alliance hike highlights Columbine-Hondo area near Taos

    August 8, 2012 
    Matthew van Buren, The Taos News

    A small group of hikers headed up Columbine Canyon July 21 with further protection for the area in mind.

    The trail, which heads south from Columbine Canyon on State Highway 38, lies within the approximately 45,000-acre Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area. It has held “wilderness study area” status for about three decades, and local groups have been seeking permanent protection for the Columbine-Hondo.

    To help further that goal, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance organizer John Olivas has been arranging hikes into the Wilderness Study Area for the past several years.

    Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, introduced legislation earlier this year to bring full-fledged wilderness status to the Columbine-Hondo. The Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    A half-dozen people joined Olivas July 21 for a hike up Columbine Creek. The trail led to the beginning of a series of high alpine meadows and entailed a six-mile round trip. Over the three-mile trip in, the trail rose moderately a total of about 1,000 vertical feet. Though the trail crosses Columbine Creek at various spots, several nice bridges extend over the wider crossings.

    The group hiked through primarily spruce and aspen forest, though cottonwoods and Ponderosa pines are present at times. Wildflowers and wild raspberries grow along the trail. Butterflies were a common sight, and the group came upon a family of grouse at one point along the trail.

    After a brief hike up Columbine Creek, a side trail leads up a rock pile on the left to the site of an old mine. A round entrance leads into a straight tunnel; members of the Wilderness Alliance hike explored it to its terminus, looking at the flaky minerals and calcium deposits that lined its walls. It is a good idea to bring a flashlight or headlamp. An archaeologist with Carson National Forest said the mine is not identified in the materials she uses and could not provide further information about its history.

    The Columbine Creek Trail is among the most moderate in the steep, rugged Columbine-Hondo. It is well-maintained and rises mildly from the Columbine Campground, at about 8,000 feet in elevation. However, it steepens as it goes deeper into the Wilderness Study Area.

    After about two miles on the Columbine Creek Trail, the Deer Creek Trail breaks off to the left, and the Columbine-Hondo National Recreation Trail follows it over Gold Hill, at about 12,700 feet in altitude, and down Long Canyon to Taos Ski Valley. Those who continue to follow Columbine Creek past its intersection with the Deer Creek Trail will find another split in the trail after about half a mile. A sign on the left points to the Placer Fork Trail, which also leads toward Gold Hill. About 1.5 miles down the Placer Fork Trail, the Willow Fork Trail splits off to the right; Willow Fork leads to the Lobo Peak Ridge, just below Gold Hill.

    After the Placer Fork split, the Columbine Creek Trail continues about two miles until the Cow Lake Trail meets it on the right. Rivers and Birds Executive Director Roberta Salazar said she tried to follow it a couple of years ago and found it to be overgrown.

    After 1.5 more miles, the Columbine Creek Trail hits the ridge that runs between Lobo Peak and Gold Hill. Here the Gavilan Trail — a steep, 2.5-mile-long stretch — meets the Columbine Creek Trail and leads down to State Road 150 just outside Taos Ski Valley.

    Multiple maps of the Columbine-Hondo can be purchased locally. The Carson National Forest field office on Cruz Alta Road offers the Forest Service’s map of the Wheeler Peak and Latir Peak wildernesses, which includes the Columbine-Hondo; and a map by Dharma Maps of the Taos Wild Rivers area also includes the Columbine-Hondo and can be purchased at Mudd ’N’ Flood on Bent Street.

    The Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition touts the wide support full wilderness protection of the area has received, including from local governments, Taos Pueblo, recreationalists, ranchers and the Taos Cycling Coalition, which can be reached through its website, www.taoscycling coalition.org. Though bicycles will not be allowed on trails, such as Long Canyon, in the Columbine-Hondo area, new cycling trails will be created by a Wheeler Peak boundary modification that is included in the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act. The Act also allows traditional uses, such as grazing, to continue in the Columbine-Hondo.

    For more information about the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition, visit www.columbinehondo.org. More can be found about the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance at www.nmwild.org.

  • AMERICA’S GREAT OUTDOORS: Salazar Announces Fee Free Days at National Parks, Other Public Lands for 2013

    Date: November 14, 2012
    Contact: Blake Androff (DOI) 202-208-6416

    WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar this week announced dates in 2013 ranging from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day to Veterans Day when more than 2,000 national parks, national forests, national wildlife refuges, and other federal lands will offer free admittance to everyone.

    “Our national parks, national wildlife refuges, national forests and other public lands offer every American a place to enjoy outdoor recreation, learn about our nation’s history and culture, and restore our souls and spirits by connecting with the natural beauty and wildness of our land,” Salazar said. “By providing free admission, we are putting out an invitation to all Americans to visit and enjoy these extraordinary treasures that belong to all our people.”

    The National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will waive their entrance fees and the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Bureau of Reclamation will waive their standard amenity fees on September 28 for National Public Lands Day and from November 9 to 11 for Veterans Day weekend.

    The National Park Service will also waive entrance fees on January 21 for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, from April 22 to 26 during National Park Week, and on August 25 to celebrate the agency’s 97th birthday.

    The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will also waive entrance fees on January 21 for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and on October 13 for National Wildlife Refuge Day.

    The Bureau of Land Management will also waive standard amenity fees on January 21 for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

    The U.S. Forest Service will also waive standard amenity fees on January 21 for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and on June 8 for Get Outdoors Day.

    “National parks and other public lands are becoming increasingly important for both our mental and physical health,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “In our fast-paced world, they provide places for good, old-fashioned social networking with others – places where we can relax and unwind, where we can experience new and different things, and where we can easily share thoughts and communal activities.”

    Tourism and outdoor recreation are also powerful economic engines in communities across the country. Recreation on federal lands in 2009 provided 440,000 jobs and contributed $55 billion to the economy.

    The fee waiver does not cover expanded amenity or user fees for things such as camping, boat launches, transportation, or special tours.

    Active duty military members and their dependents are eligible for a free annual pass that provides entrance to lands managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Forest Service. The America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Program also offers a free lifetime pass for people with disabilities, a $10 lifetime senior pass for those age 62 and over, and a $80 annual pass for the general public.

    America’s great outdoors should be experienced by everyone,” said Salazar. “Our fantastic network of public lands provides world class recreational opportunities, the chance to view abundant wildlife in natural habitats, sites that showcase our nation’s rich and diverse history, and some of the most incredible scenery found anyway. The fee free days will give both first time and repeat visitors a good reason to spend time in these extraordinary places.”

    Date Event Agency Participating
    January 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Day National Park Service
    Fish & Wildlife Service
    Bureau of Land Management
    US Forest Service
    April 22 – 26 National Park Week National Park Service
    June 8 Great Outdoors Day US Forest Service
    August 25 National Park Service Birthday National Park Service
    September 28 National Public Lands Day National Park Service
    Fish & Wildlife Service
    Bureau of Land Management
    Bureau of Reclamation
    US Forest Service
    October 13 National Wildlife Refuge Day Fish & Wildlife Service
    November 9 – 11 Veterans Day weekend National Park Service
    Fish & Wildlife Service
    Bureau of Land Management
    Bureau of Reclamation
    US Forest Service