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2013

  • The Taos News (NM)
    December 17, 2013

    Roberta Salazar, executive director of Rivers & Birds, and John Olivas, northern director of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, were among the dozen conservation leaders honored when businesses and groups gathered Dec. 9 in Albuquerque for the first New Mexico Outdoors Coalition Engaged Citizens Award Reception.

    Salazar and Olivas were given awards that recognize their enduring conservation impacts and broad scope of accomplishments in New Mexico.

    New Mexico Outdoors Coalition promotes collaborative partnerships around conservation, recreation, education, health, tourism, youth engagement and stewardship.

    Doug Cohen, event organizer, said that many organizations collaborated to recognize outstanding leaders working on behalf of the outdoors.

    Salazar who was nominated by the Sierra Club, said “Rivers & Birds deeply appreciates the Sierra Club nomination. Our protection efforts for the Río Grande Del Norte and Columbine Hondo areas were collaborative on many levels and underscore our local community’s respect for Earth. In terms of environmental education efforts, it has been the greatest joy to connect nearly 4,000 local Taos students to nature. I would love to see environmental education as a well-funded and mandated subject for school students. With community support, Rivers & Birds is shaping future leaders who will respect and care for nature.”

    Olivas, who was nominated by New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, said, “Thanks to the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance staff for making the nomination to receive such a prestigious award. The work that has been done to protect our land will be seen for generations to come! It has been fabulous to work with such diverse coalitions.”

    http://www.taosnews.com/news/article_2ab42d20-6377-11e3-80b8-001a4bcf887a.html

  • By Dianne Stallings
    Ruidoso News
    08/20/2013

    When a package arrived from Jesse Juen, New Mexico director of the Bureau of Land Management, the students in teacher Rudy Barbosa’s fifth-grade class gathered around as he opened it, eager to see what was tucked inside its folds.

    “The box was filled with 25 homemade cookies that Jesse Juen himself made in his kitchen,” said Styve Homnick, the man who brought the director and the students together a week earlier to create an opportunity for the young Otero Mesa preservation supporters to share their thoughts with the director.

    “It came with a very caring card that encouraged them to keep on their path to preserve their ancestral homelands,” Homnick said.

    He explained that Barbosa taught one of two fifth-grade classes in the Mescalero Apache School District. Each class had about 25 students.

    “Four kids, two boys and two girls, stood up in front of Jesse and stated their cases, then he was presented with a medicine bag with pollen, turquoise and tobacco, and a big poster the kids made,” Homnick said. “Each drew a picture, and in large letters it said ‘Protect Otero Mesa.’ A girl stood up and recited a prayer in Apache and two boys read letters they wrote to President (Barack) Obama.”

    Homnick said Juen appeared moved and he shared his feelings of support for them. Bill Childress, the BLM director who oversees Otero Mesa from the Las Cruces field office, also was there and received a medicine bag and poster about protecting Alamo Mountain, a sacred site, Homnick said. The poster was drawn by the girl who recited the Apache prayer.After numerous meetings with BLM officials, Homnick, who heads a grassroots organization dedicated to protecting the mesa, said he now is convinced the best approach is National Conservation Area status.

    “This would preserve a relatively small portion of the mesa that contains a rare eco-region and give it a buffer zone without the commercializing that a national monument would invoke,” Homnick said. “I made it clear to BLM officials that I changed my previous position and would fight along with them for NCA designation. I am convinced this is the most reasonable way the mesa’s unique abundance of wildlife and cultural history will be given the protection it deserves. The bird watchers still will be able to go birding, plus, ranchers with more knowledge of what a national conservation area is in relationship to grazing rights, will be relieved.”

    He also said he would focus on working with supporters among the Mescalero Apache to obtain Sacred Site status for Alamo Mountain, Homnick said.

    “The heart of my quest is based on my new realizations about the importance of protecting Alamo Mountain from harm’s way,” he said. “That mountain is in a very vulnerable spot and has much more to it than people realize. I came to my conclusions after numerous negative experiences taking non-tribal member groups there for viewing.”

    Some of those negative experiences included outsiders wearing hiking boots and digging in their heels on low-lying petroglyphs trying to photograph ones higher, he said. “A few months earlier, a medicine woman told young tribal kids never to touch the petroglyphs,” he said.

    Other people have chipped off petroglyphs in the dark of night. Homnick said he no longer will share the location of the mountain’s secrets with nontribal members.

    “Over the last year, I realized that the traditional foods of the Apache, such as ‘Indian bananas’ are very hard to find, but grow in abundance on the mountain,” he said. “The place is the heart of Apacheria. It was a remote and mystical cathedral and safe haven when (the bands) were intruded upon by foreign invaders. It harbored one of the only two springs for millions of acres. Once the Mescalero were removed from the mesa, its legend was lost over time. I began to see that after my 45-year friendship with so many tribal members and their children’s need to experience ‘hands-on’ Apache life, that Sacred Site status is essential.”

    With its rediscovery, many tribal members now go there and pray, he said.

    While a national monument would bring roads, cell phones and marked pathways, a national conservation area preserves quietly, he said.

    “I had to put a huge amount of time and energy into convincing my cohorts, the environmental groups and the Citizens for Otero Mesa to see my point and support it,” Homnick said.

    But some members of New Mexico’s congressional delegation have taken a view that protection must be balanced with economic interests. The most recent observations came from U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce during an interview while the Republican was on the August break from Congress.

    “We should be drilling it with the agreement that protects the (cultural, wildlife and landscape) resources and still allows us to get to our natural resources,” he said. “We’ve been constant on that since 2002. It would be an economic boom to this areas. In Eddy, Lea and Chaves counties, a couple have as strong an economy as anywhere in the country, especially anywhere in the state.”

    The BLM seven years ago came up with a (resource management) plan that would leave 95 percent of the mesa untouched, the congressman said. “That’s really reasonable. And of the 5 percent, you only really touch half of that. You’re talking about 2 percent to 3 percent of the footprint of the entire mesa. The idea that they should shut down resource production to preserve every single ounce is just one that I think most Americans think is extreme. We need to drive cars. We need to heat our homes and we need resources. Let’s not be one dimensional, not total business, not total environment, but the two balanced together. Ninety-five to five to me is really a fair split. Then (former governor Bill) Richardson brought the lawsuit and stopped it cold.”

    As for cultural concerns, Pearce said laws already exist to protect traditional and cultural properties.

    “Every piece of New Mexico was walked on by Indians at one point,” he said. “If we’re going to do it, we need to do it all the way. Ruidoso shouldn’t be here, if we’re going to go to the extreme. My point with Native Americans is that I am respectful, You show me what was sacred ground and why.”

    He took a hard stance against allowing coal mining that might have damaged a lake used by Native Americans for their salt extraction, incurring the wrath of a former Republican state lands commissioner, Pearce said.

    “But I am not willing just because somebody says we walked on those grounds at some point,” he said. “I walk around in the desert as much as anybody and you find campsites everywhere. At some point, Geronimo swept across this region and they could cover 50 miles a day on foot. So there is a law that protects it. There is a discussion to be had, but you can’t just say everything is off limits.”

    He contended that if production fields were developed on the mesa in Otero County that the Ruidoso would be the residence of choice for many of the workers.

    “Some would live in Alamogordo, but a lot of people would choose the quality of living up here and drive down there everyday,” Pearce said. “In oil fields, it is not unusual to drive 95 miles out of Hobbs.”

    He’s concerned that a National Conservation Area designation would stop all development, Pearce said.

    “I think that is an extreme viewpoint that can’t be sustained,” he said. “We could be energy independent now, if the government were allowing offshore and production zone already drilled in the Rocky Mountains. This whole boom in technology is creating access to resources that we haven’t been able to harness before, One find in Carlsbad is more than all the oil taken out of New Mexico in our entire history.

    A new three dimensional imaging seismic instrument and the ability to drill down and then out horizontally up to seven miles reduces the number of wells needed, he said.

    “So the footprint is getting much smaller and the technology on casings, which was pretty good already, is better; and the cement technology to keep groundwater contamination from occurring,”

    He doesn’t agree that every site has to be locked up, he said, adding, “By the way, it is usually locked up from people with disabilities, anybody who needs to drive. Many of these places are accessible only to backpackers and hikers and that’s a very small percentage of the population. So that’s just one way of shutting down the resource and I think it is extreme.”

  • For Immediate Release
    February 20, 2013

    TAOS, NM (February 20, 2013) – Members of the northern New Mexico community gathered in Taos on Saturday at a coalition meeting to urge Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and Rep. Ben Ray Luján to protect Columbine Hondo as designated Wilderness. Over two-dozen people at the meeting also thanked the delegation for re-introducing legislation to protect Rio Grande del Norte, and supported President Obama designating it as a national monument.

    The meeting occurred shortly after the 112th Congress ended, which was the first Congress since 1966 to not protect a single acre of wilderness, and the first Congress since World War II to not protect a single new acre of public land as a national monument, national park or wilderness area.

    There was diverse participation in the meeting, ranging from veterans, ranchers and grazing permitees, Taos Pueblo, Hispanic leaders, mountain bikers, local elected officials, business owners, sportsmen, land grant representatives, and conservationists.

    The community members met to show their support for the delegation re-introducing legislation to protect Columbine-Hondo. Former Sen. Jeff Bingaman and Sen. Tom Udall introduced the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act in the 112th Congress, and the community asked the entire delegation to introduce legislation in the House and Senate soon.

    “As a livestock permittee, I realize that wilderness designations actually provide assurance that our traditional grazing rights will always be protected,” said Erminio Martinez, a livestock permittee in the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. “I am grateful that you as our Congressional leaders are willing to take this to Congress to ensure that the Columbine Hondo Wilderness is enacted so that all of our surrounding communities and future generations can enjoy and benefit from these beautiful mountains, as we have.”

    Future legislation would hopefully protect the 45,000-acre Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. The Columbine Hondo area north of Taos boasts some of the state’s most spectacular landscapes, encompassing the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, including Gold Hill, its highest peak. Elk, mountain lions, black bear, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, pine marten, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout make their home here. It contains the headwaters for two important rivers that supply water to the acequias used by the community.

    “The wilderness experience while hunting or fishing provides an experience that has no rival,” said Max Trujillo of the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “Protecting these areas will ensure that our fish and wildlife resources along with this excellent habitat will naturally exist, and future generations of hunters and anglers will have a place to experience what will soon become a rarity in the United States. Protecting the Columbine Hondo will prove to be a welcome addition to the natural treasures of Northern New Mexico and a destination for generations of hunters and anglers.”

    Congress formally recognized the wilderness values and character of the Columbine Hondo area in 1980 and gave it interim protection as a wilderness study area (WSA). Designation as wilderness is the highest form of protection, and bars any development.

    ###

    The mission of the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Coalition is to protect the land, water, values, heritage, culture, and traditions embodied in the lands and communities surrounding the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area by elevating its status to full Wilderness designation.

    VIEW CLOSING STATEMENTS FROM THE MEETING

  • For Immediate Release

    TAOS, NM (February 20, 2013) – Members of the northern New Mexico community gathered in Taos on Saturday at a coalition meeting to urge Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and Rep. Ben Ray Luján to protect Columbine Hondo as designated Wilderness. Over two-dozen people at the meeting also thanked the delegation for re-introducing legislation to protect Rio Grande del Norte, and supported President Obama designating it as a national monument.

    The meeting occurred shortly after the 112th Congress ended, which was the first Congress since 1966 to not protect a single acre of wilderness, and the first Congress since World War II to not protect a single new acre of public land as a national monument, national park or wilderness area.

    There was diverse participation in the meeting, ranging from veterans, ranchers and grazing permitees, Taos Pueblo, Hispanic leaders, mountain bikers, local elected officials, business owners, sportsmen, land grant representatives, and conservationists.

    The community members met to show their support for the delegation re-introducing legislation to protect Columbine-Hondo. Former Sen. Jeff Bingaman and Sen. Tom Udall introduced the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act in the 112th Congress, and the community asked the entire delegation to introduce legislation in the House and Senate soon.

    “As a livestock permittee, I realize that wilderness designations actually provide assurance that our traditional grazing rights will always be protected,” said Erminio Martinez, a livestock permittee in the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. “I am grateful that you as our Congressional leaders are willing to take this to Congress to ensure that the Columbine Hondo Wilderness is enacted so that all of our surrounding communities and future generations can enjoy and benefit from these beautiful mountains, as we have.”

    Future legislation would hopefully protect the 45,000-acre Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. The Columbine Hondo area north of Taos boasts some of the state’s most spectacular landscapes, encompassing the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, including Gold Hill, its highest peak. Elk, mountain lions, black bear, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, pine marten, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout make their home here. It contains the headwaters for two important rivers that supply water to the acequias used by the community.

    “The wilderness experience while hunting or fishing provides an experience that has no rival,” said Max Trujillo of the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “Protecting these areas will ensure that our fish and wildlife resources along with this excellent habitat will naturally exist, and future generations of hunters and anglers will have a place to experience what will soon become a rarity in the United States. Protecting the Columbine Hondo will prove to be a welcome addition to the natural treasures of Northern New Mexico and a destination for generations of hunters and anglers.”

    Congress formally recognized the wilderness values and character of the Columbine Hondo area in 1980 and gave it interim protection as a wilderness study area (WSA). Designation as wilderness is the highest form of protection, and bars any development.

    ###

    The mission of the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Coalition is to protect the land, water, values, heritage, culture, and traditions embodied in the lands and communities surrounding the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area by elevating its status to full Wilderness designation.

    VIEW CLOSING STATEMENTS FROM THE MEETING

  • For Immediate Release
    February 20, 2013

    TAOS, NM (February 20, 2013) – Members of the northern New Mexico community gathered in Taos on Saturday at a coalition meeting to urge Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and Rep. Ben Ray Luján to protect Columbine Hondo as designated Wilderness. Over two-dozen people at the meeting also thanked the delegation for re-introducing legislation to protect Rio Grande del Norte, and supported President Obama designating it as a national monument.

    The meeting occurred shortly after the 112th Congress ended, which was the first Congress since 1966 to not protect a single acre of wilderness, and the first Congress since World War II to not protect a single new acre of public land as a national monument, national park or wilderness area.

    There was diverse participation in the meeting, ranging from veterans, ranchers and grazing permitees, Taos Pueblo, Hispanic leaders, mountain bikers, local elected officials, business owners, sportsmen, land grant representatives, and conservationists.

    The community members met to show their support for the delegation re-introducing legislation to protect Columbine-Hondo. Former Sen. Jeff Bingaman and Sen. Tom Udall introduced the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act in the 112th Congress, and the community asked the entire delegation to introduce legislation in the House and Senate soon.

    “As a livestock permittee, I realize that wilderness designations actually provide assurance that our traditional grazing rights will always be protected,” said Erminio Martinez, a livestock permittee in the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. “I am grateful that you as our Congressional leaders are willing to take this to Congress to ensure that the Columbine Hondo Wilderness is enacted so that all of our surrounding communities and future generations can enjoy and benefit from these beautiful mountains, as we have.”

    Future legislation would hopefully protect the 45,000-acre Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area. The Columbine Hondo area north of Taos boasts some of the state’s most spectacular landscapes, encompassing the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, including Gold Hill, its highest peak. Elk, mountain lions, black bear, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, pine marten, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout make their home here. It contains the headwaters for two important rivers that supply water to the acequias used by the community.

    “The wilderness experience while hunting or fishing provides an experience that has no rival,” said Max Trujillo of the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “Protecting these areas will ensure that our fish and wildlife resources along with this excellent habitat will naturally exist, and future generations of hunters and anglers will have a place to experience what will soon become a rarity in the United States. Protecting the Columbine Hondo will prove to be a welcome addition to the natural treasures of Northern New Mexico and a destination for generations of hunters and anglers.”

    Congress formally recognized the wilderness values and character of the Columbine Hondo area in 1980 and gave it interim protection as a wilderness study area (WSA). Designation as wilderness is the highest form of protection, and bars any development.

    ###

    The mission of the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Coalition is to protect the land, water, values, heritage, culture, and traditions embodied in the lands and communities surrounding the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Study Area by elevating its status to full Wilderness designation.

    VIEW CLOSING STATEMENTS FROM THE MEETING

  • By JOHN M. BRODER for the New York Times
    February 6, 2013

    WASHINGTON — President Obama has selected Sally Jewell, the chief executive of Recreational Equipment Inc., to lead the Interior Department, White House officials said Wednesday.

    If confirmed, Ms. Jewell, a former oil company official and longtime advocate for conservation and outdoor recreation, will take over a department that has been embroiled in controversy over regulation of oil and gas on public lands and waters in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Arctic Ocean. She also will assume responsibility for the stewardship of hundreds of millions of acres of public lands, from the Everglades of Florida to the Cascades of Washington State.

    Ms. Jewell, who also worked as a banker, took over REI in 2005, when the company was one of the most successful outdoor outfitters in the country. The company has grown rapidly under her tenure and now boasts roughly $2 billion a year in sales.

    She will replace Ken Salazar, who has led the department since the beginning of the Obama administration. Mr. Salazar, a Colorado Democrat, was elected to the Senate in 2004, the same year as Mr. Obama.

    Ms. Jewell, a native of the Seattle area and a graduate of the University of Washington with a degree in mechanical engineering, has been a lifelong outdoors enthusiast. As a child she sailed in Puget Sound and camped throughout the Pacific Northwest, according to a 2005 profile in the Seattle Times.

    In 2011, she introduced President Obama at the White House conference on “America’s Great Outdoor Initiative,” noting that the $289 billion outdoor-recreation industry is the source of 6.5 million jobs.

    She received the 2009 Rachel Carson Award for environmental conservation from the Audubon Society; the 2008 Nonprofit Director of the Year award from the National Association of Corporate Directors, and The Green Globe — Environmental Catalyst Award from King County, Wash., among others.

    She is expected to face vigorous questioning during confirmation hearings about her approach to resource development on public lands. Republicans in Congress have criticized the Obama administration for holding back public lands from oil and gas leasing and from imposing overly restrictive regulations on hydraulic fracturing and other extraction methods.

    White House aides said that Ms. Jewell’s engineering background and experience as a Mobil Oil executive could help blunt some of that criticism.

    Ms. Jewell will also face scrutiny from environmental and conservation advocates who will want to know her approach to preservation of public lands. Just Tuesday, Bruce Babbitt, the interior secretary under President Bill Clinton, criticized Mr. Obama as favoring oil and gas leasing over protection of government-owned lands.

    “So far under President Obama, industry has been winning the race as it obtains more and more land for oil and gas,” Mr. Babbitt said. “Over the past four years, the industry has leased more than 6 million acres, compared with only 2.6 million acres permanently protected.”

    “This lopsided public land administration in favor of the oil and gas industry cannot continue,” he said.

    The Interior Department post has traditionally gone to a politician from the Western United States, like Mr. Salazar and Mr. Babbitt, a former governor of Arizona. Under President George W. Bush Gale A. Norton, a former attorney general of Colorado, and Dirk Kempthorne, a former governor and senator from Idaho, served in the position. Ms. Jewell, if confirmed, would represent a different model, a corporate executive with experience in two of the major missions of the department, resource development and conservation.

  • By Steve Ramirez / Las Cruces Sun-News
    Posted: 03/25/2013

    LAS CRUCES — There could be a link between the Oval Office and the Organ Mountains, or so organizers of a proposed national monument in Doña Ana County hope.

    Monday, President Obama, through his ability to use the Antiquities Act, designated the Río Grande Del Norte National Monument, near Taos, in northern New Mexico. Organizers seeking the same designation of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks as a national monument are optimistic Obama will soon do the same.

    “It helps us,” said Jeff Steinborn, who has helped lead the cause to get the Organs established as a national monument, of Obama’s proclamation Monday. “It recognizes the president is ready to using his authority, through the Antiquities Act, to protect important landscape. And, there’s no question that people believe the Organ Mountains are, indeed, important landscape.”

    The 240,000-acre Río Grande Del Norte National Monument becomes the 11th such designation of land in New Mexico since 1906. The designation was widely welcomed by Taos and Rio Arriba county residents.

    Retired U.S. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, Sen. Martin Heinrich, Questa Mayor Esther Garcia and Taos Pueblo War Chief Samuel Gomez joined the president for the signing ceremony in the Oval Office.

    “This is a great day for New Mexico,” said Bingaman, who worked on securing the designation since 2007. “I’m glad that President Obama found northern New Mexico’s landscape so compelling that he was willing to make the Río Grande del Norte his largest monument designation to date. There is no doubt in my mind that the community, which has strongly supported this effort, will benefit from the conservation and cultural protections that come with this designation.”

    Doña Ana County supporters of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks designation reiterated the proposal still has broad-based community support and would protect iconic landscapes with diverse cultural heritage.

    “The proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument is pivotal and anchoring legislation that will protect all that New Mexicans hold sacred: land, mountains, sky, animal, plant and mineral life,” said Las Cruces author and Border Book Festival director Denise Chávez. “It is up to us as caretakers of La Tierra Encantada – our magical, miraculous, enchanted and dearly loved New Mexico – to protect and respect the legacy of our ancestors. We see in their petroglyphs a world, a people, a culture that is so intrinsically ‘Lo Nuestro’ – our own. As we follow the tracks of those who came before – and imagine our grandmothers grinding their seeds and corn in the metates and storing their food in the huecos, the hollows of rock found in these places to be honored and protected – we truly divine that we are but another traveler on the great road. And that road is ours to respect to love and to protect.”

    Five local governments – Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, Doña Ana County, city of Las Cruces, town of Mesilla, and city of El Paso, have unanimously supported the proposed national monument. A recent poll showed more than 80 percent of registered voters in Doña Ana County support the creation of a national monument to protect natural and cultural heritage.

    “President Obama’s designation of the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument is a win for all New Mexicans,” said Renee Frank, president of the Las Cruces Green Chamber of Commerce. “National monuments are proven job creators for nearby communities. We’re hopeful that President Obama will help bring the same economic boost to our region by protecting the iconic Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks region.”

    Victor Gallegos, owner of Nopalitos Restaurant and Nopalitos Galeria, added, “As a family-owned business located along the Camino Real del Adentro Historic Trail, we know firsthand how historical preservation can help a local economy and strengthen cultural identity. We strongly believe protecting the proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks national monument will be good for business, drawing more people to Las Cruces and our surrounding region.”

    John Connell, president of Doña Ana County Associated Sportsmen, said Obama’s formal designation Monday is encouraging for many outdoors enthusiasts.

    “With today’s action, the president brings hope to southern New Mexico sportsmen who have worked for decades to protect the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Region, like our prized public lands in the Sierra de Las Uvas and Potrillo Mountains,” Connell said.

    Heinrich said he and Sen. Tom Udall, both New Mexico democrats, will continue to encourage Obama to consider using his authority through the Antiquities Act. But they also intend to pursue federal legislation to enhance the chances of a national monument designation for Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks.

    “It’s very much a legislative priority,” said Heinrich, of efforts to obtain that designation. “Senator Udall and I are still engaged to introduce legislation. It will help build support. We have to be diligent.”

    Marissa Padilla, Udall’s spokeswoman, said legislation from New Mexico’s two senators would likely be reintroduced in the U.S. Senate by this summer. The past two years, Udall and Bingaman co-authored legislation for the Organ Mountains.

    “There is very broad support for this proposal, extensive support,” said Padilla, referring to southern New Mexico residents who would like to see the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks proposal become reality. “The Department of Interior is aware of that, and that is very important. It’s a huge sign of strength when the local community can show it is behind a proposal like that. Senators Udall and Heinrich will continue their efforts to support this designation.”

    But there has been some opposition, or disagreement, about the national monument proposal. Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M., has introduced federal legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives that reduces the size of the land that would be protected, from the approximately 600,000 acres supporters of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peak proposal want.

    Also, in recent weeks, the Hispano Chamber of Commerce de Las Cruces, has demanded that its name be stricken among supporters of the monument proposal. Hispano Chamber officials have said the legislation now being considered is substantially different than what was initially proposed.

    Steve Ramirez can be reached at 575-541-5452. Follow him on Twitter @SteveRamirez6

    National monuments
    •President Obama signed a proclamation Monday to establish the Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument in northern New Mexico.
    •The monument was among five that Obama designated as national monuments through his authority to use the Antiquities Act.
    •Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument becomes the 11th national monument in New Mexico.
    •In southern New Mexico, there are three national monuments: Gila Cliff Dwellings (established in 1907), Carlsbad Caverns (1923), and White Sands (1933)
    •Organizers in southern New Mexico also want Obama to use the same authority to establish the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument.
    •Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M., has introduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives, and Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, both Democrats, are preparing legislation that will be introduced into the U.S. Senate later this year.
    Visit the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument website. Read President Obama’sproclamationestablishing the Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument.

    Antiquities Act
    The Antiquities Act has been used by presidents to preserve extraordinary landscapes. All New Mexico sites are in bold. (Source: National Parks Service)
    Theodore Roosevelt
    Sept. 24, 1906: Devils Tower, Wyo.
    Dec. 8, 1906: El Morro
    Dec. 8, 1906: Montezuma Castle, AZ
    Dec. 8, 1906: Petrified Forest, AZ
    March 11, 1907: Chaco Canyon
    May 6,1907: Cinder Cone, Calif.
    May 6, 1907: Lassen Peak, Calif.
    Nov. 16, 1907: Gila Cliff Dwellings
    Dec. 19, 1907: Tonto, Ariz.
    Jan. 9, 1908: Muir Woods, Calif.
    Jan. 11, 1908: Grand Canyon, Ariz.
    Jan. 16, 1908: Pinnacles, Calif.
    Feb. 7, 1908: Jewel Cave, S.D.
    April 16, 1908: Natural Bridges, Utah
    May 11, 1908: Lewis and Clark Cavern, Mont.
    Sept. 15, 1908: Tumacacori, Ariz.
    Dec. 7, 1908: Wheeler, Colo.
    March 2, 1909: Mount Olympus, Wash.
    William Howard Taft
    March 20, 1909: Navajo, Ariz.
    July 12, 1909: Oregon Caves, Ore.
    July 31, 1909: Mukuntuweap, Utah
    Sept. 21, 1909: Shoshone Cavern, Wyo.
    Nov. 1, 1909: Gran Quivira (now Salinas Pueblo Missions)
    March 23, 1910: Sitka, Ark.
    May 30, 1910: Rainbow Bridge, Utah
    June 23, 1910: Big Hole Battlefield, Mont.
    May 24, 1911: Colorado, Colo.
    July 6, 1911: Devils Postpile, Calif.
    Woodrow Wilson
    Oct. 14, 1913: Cabrillo, Calif.
    Jan. 31, 1914: Papago Saguaro, Ariz.
    Oct. 4, 1915: Dinosaur, Utah-Colo.
    Nov. 30, 1915: Walnut Canyon, Ariz.
    Feb. 11, 1916: Bandelier
    July 8, 1916: Sieur de Monts, Maine
    Aug. 9, 1916: Capulin Mountain (now Capulin Volcano)
    Oct. 25, 1916: Old Kasaan, Alaska
    June 29, 1917: Verendrye, N.D.
    March 18, 1918: Zion, Utah (incorporated Mukuntuweap, Utah.)
    Aug. 3, 1918: Casa Grande (now Casa Grande Ruins), Ariz.
    Sept. 24, 1918: Katmai, Alaska
    Dec. 12, 1919: Scotts Bluff, Neb.
    Dec. 12, 1919: Yucca House, Colo.
    Warren G. Harding
    Jan. 24, 1922: Lehman Caves, Nev.
    Oct. 14, 1922: Timpanogos Cave, Utah
    Oct. 21, 1922: Fossil Cycad, S.D.
    Jan. 24, 1923: Aztec Ruin (now Aztec Ruins)
    March 2, 1923: Hovenweep, Utah-Colo.
    March 2, 1923: Mound City Group, Ohio
    May 31, 1923: Pipe Spring, Ariz.
    June 8, 1923: Bryce Canyon, Utah
    Calvin Coolidge
    Oct. 25, 1923: Carlsbad Caverns
    April 18, 1924: Chiricahua, Ariz.
    May 2, 1924: Craters of the Moon, Idaho
    Oct. 15, 1924: Castle Pinckney, S.C.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Marion (now Castillo de San Marcos), Fla.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Matanzas, Fla.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Pulaski, Ga.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Statue of Liberty, N.Y.
    Dec. 9, 1924: Wupatki, Ariz.
    Feb. 26, 1925: Glacier Bay, Alaska
    Feb. 26, 1925: Meriwether Lewis, Tenn.
    Sept. 5, 1925: Father Millet Cross, N.Y.
    Nov. 21, 1925: Lava Beds, Calif.
    Herbert Hoover
    April 12, 1929: Arches, Utah
    May 11, 1929: Holy Cross, Colo.
    May 26, 1930: Sunset Crater (now Sunset Crater Volcano), Ariz.
    March 17, 1932: Great Sand Dunes, Colo.
    Dec. 22, 1932: Grand Canyon, Ariz.
    Jan. 18, 1933: White Sands
    Feb. 11, 1933: Death Valley, Calif.-Nev.
    March 1, 1933: Saguaro, Ariz.
    March 3, 1933: Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colo.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt
    April 26, 1933: Channel Islands, Calif.
    Aug. 22, 1933: Cedar Breaks, Utah
    Jan. 4, 1935: Fort Jefferson, Fla.
    Aug. 10, 1936: Joshua Tree, Calif.
    Jan 22, 1937: Zion, Utah
    April 4, 1937: Organ Pipe Cactus, Ariz.
    Aug. 2, 1937: Capitol Reef, Utah
    July 16, 1938: Fort Laramie, Wyo.
    May 17, 1939: Santa Rosa Island, Fla.
    July 24, 1939: Tuzigoot, Ariz.
    March 15, 1943: Jackson Hole, Wyo.
    Harry S. Truman
    Oct. 25, 1949: Effigy Mounds, Iowa
    Dwight D. Eisenhower
    July 15, 1956: Edison Laboratory, N.J.
    Jan. 18, 1961: Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Md-W.Va.
    John F. Kennedy
    May 11, 1961: Russell Cave, Ala.
    Dec. 28, 1961: Buck Island Reef, Virgin Islands
    Lyndon B. Johnson
    Jan. 20, 1969: Marble Canyon, Ariz.
    Jimmy Carter
    Dec. 1, 1978: Admiralty Island, Alaska (Forest Service)
    Dec. 1, 1978: Aniakchak, Alaska
    Dec.1, 1978: Becharof, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Bering Land Bridge, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Cape Krusenstern, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Denali, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Gates of the Arctic, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Kenai Fjords, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Kobuk Valley, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Lake Clark, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Misty Fjords, Alaska (Forest Service)
    Dec. 1, 1978: Noatak, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Wrangell-St. Elias, Alaska
    Dec.1, 1978: Yukon-Charley, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Yukon Flats, Alaska
    William J. Clinton
    Sept. 18, 1996: Grand Staircase-Escalante, Utah (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan.11, 2000: Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Ariz. (Jointly managed by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 10, 2000: Pinnacles National Monument, Calif. (Expansion)
    Jan. 11, 2000: Agua Fria National Monument, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 11, 2000: California Coastal National Monument, Calif. (Bureau of Land Management)
    April 15, 2000: Giant Sequoia National Monument, Calif. (Expansion – USDA Forest Service)
    June 9, 2000: Hanford Reach, Wash. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
    June 9, 2000: Ironwood Forest, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    June 9, 2000: Canyons of the Ancients, Colo. (Bureau of Land Management)
    June 9, 2000: Cascade-Siskiyou, Ore. (Bureau of Land Management)
    July 7, 2000: President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument (Armed Forces Retirement Home)
    Nov. 9, 2000: Craters of the Moon, Idaho (Expansion of Existing Monument)
    Nov. 9, 2000: Vermillion Cliffs, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Carrizo Plain, CA (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Minidoka Internment, Idaho
    Jan. 17, 2001: Pompeys Piller, Mont. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Sonoran Desert National Monument, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, Mont. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Virgin Islands Coral Reef, Virgin Islands
    Jan. 20, 2001: Governors Island-Castle Williams and Fort Jay, N.Y.
    George W. Bush
    Feb. 27, 2006: African Burial Ground National Monument, N.Y.
    June 15, 2006: Papahanaumokuakea Hawaii Islands Marine National Monument. Hawaii
    Dec. 5, 2008: World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument (Incorporated USS Arizona Memorial), Hawaii

  • By Steve Ramirez / Las Cruces Sun-News
    Posted: 03/25/2013

    LAS CRUCES — There could be a link between the Oval Office and the Organ Mountains, or so organizers of a proposed national monument in Doña Ana County hope.

    Monday, President Obama, through his ability to use the Antiquities Act, designated the Río Grande Del Norte National Monument, near Taos, in northern New Mexico. Organizers seeking the same designation of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks as a national monument are optimistic Obama will soon do the same.

    “It helps us,” said Jeff Steinborn, who has helped lead the cause to get the Organs established as a national monument, of Obama’s proclamation Monday. “It recognizes the president is ready to using his authority, through the Antiquities Act, to protect important landscape. And, there’s no question that people believe the Organ Mountains are, indeed, important landscape.”

    The 240,000-acre Río Grande Del Norte National Monument becomes the 11th such designation of land in New Mexico since 1906. The designation was widely welcomed by Taos and Rio Arriba county residents.

    Retired U.S. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, Sen. Martin Heinrich, Questa Mayor Esther Garcia and Taos Pueblo War Chief Samuel Gomez joined the president for the signing ceremony in the Oval Office.

    “This is a great day for New Mexico,” said Bingaman, who worked on securing the designation since 2007. “I’m glad that President Obama found northern New Mexico’s landscape so compelling that he was willing to make the Río Grande del Norte his largest monument designation to date. There is no doubt in my mind that the community, which has strongly supported this effort, will benefit from the conservation and cultural protections that come with this designation.”

    Doña Ana County supporters of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks designation reiterated the proposal still has broad-based community support and would protect iconic landscapes with diverse cultural heritage.

    “The proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument is pivotal and anchoring legislation that will protect all that New Mexicans hold sacred: land, mountains, sky, animal, plant and mineral life,” said Las Cruces author and Border Book Festival director Denise Chávez. “It is up to us as caretakers of La Tierra Encantada – our magical, miraculous, enchanted and dearly loved New Mexico – to protect and respect the legacy of our ancestors. We see in their petroglyphs a world, a people, a culture that is so intrinsically ‘Lo Nuestro’ – our own. As we follow the tracks of those who came before – and imagine our grandmothers grinding their seeds and corn in the metates and storing their food in the huecos, the hollows of rock found in these places to be honored and protected – we truly divine that we are but another traveler on the great road. And that road is ours to respect to love and to protect.”

    Five local governments – Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, Doña Ana County, city of Las Cruces, town of Mesilla, and city of El Paso, have unanimously supported the proposed national monument. A recent poll showed more than 80 percent of registered voters in Doña Ana County support the creation of a national monument to protect natural and cultural heritage.

    “President Obama’s designation of the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument is a win for all New Mexicans,” said Renee Frank, president of the Las Cruces Green Chamber of Commerce. “National monuments are proven job creators for nearby communities. We’re hopeful that President Obama will help bring the same economic boost to our region by protecting the iconic Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks region.”

    Victor Gallegos, owner of Nopalitos Restaurant and Nopalitos Galeria, added, “As a family-owned business located along the Camino Real del Adentro Historic Trail, we know firsthand how historical preservation can help a local economy and strengthen cultural identity. We strongly believe protecting the proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks national monument will be good for business, drawing more people to Las Cruces and our surrounding region.”

    John Connell, president of Doña Ana County Associated Sportsmen, said Obama’s formal designation Monday is encouraging for many outdoors enthusiasts.

    “With today’s action, the president brings hope to southern New Mexico sportsmen who have worked for decades to protect the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Region, like our prized public lands in the Sierra de Las Uvas and Potrillo Mountains,” Connell said.

    Heinrich said he and Sen. Tom Udall, both New Mexico democrats, will continue to encourage Obama to consider using his authority through the Antiquities Act. But they also intend to pursue federal legislation to enhance the chances of a national monument designation for Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks.

    “It’s very much a legislative priority,” said Heinrich, of efforts to obtain that designation. “Senator Udall and I are still engaged to introduce legislation. It will help build support. We have to be diligent.”

    Marissa Padilla, Udall’s spokeswoman, said legislation from New Mexico’s two senators would likely be reintroduced in the U.S. Senate by this summer. The past two years, Udall and Bingaman co-authored legislation for the Organ Mountains.

    “There is very broad support for this proposal, extensive support,” said Padilla, referring to southern New Mexico residents who would like to see the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks proposal become reality. “The Department of Interior is aware of that, and that is very important. It’s a huge sign of strength when the local community can show it is behind a proposal like that. Senators Udall and Heinrich will continue their efforts to support this designation.”

    But there has been some opposition, or disagreement, about the national monument proposal. Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M., has introduced federal legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives that reduces the size of the land that would be protected, from the approximately 600,000 acres supporters of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peak proposal want.

    Also, in recent weeks, the Hispano Chamber of Commerce de Las Cruces, has demanded that its name be stricken among supporters of the monument proposal. Hispano Chamber officials have said the legislation now being considered is substantially different than what was initially proposed.

    Steve Ramirez can be reached at 575-541-5452. Follow him on Twitter @SteveRamirez6

    National monuments
    •President Obama signed a proclamation Monday to establish the Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument in northern New Mexico.
    •The monument was among five that Obama designated as national monuments through his authority to use the Antiquities Act.
    •Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument becomes the 11th national monument in New Mexico.
    •In southern New Mexico, there are three national monuments: Gila Cliff Dwellings (established in 1907), Carlsbad Caverns (1923), and White Sands (1933)
    •Organizers in southern New Mexico also want Obama to use the same authority to establish the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument.
    •Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M., has introduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives, and Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, both Democrats, are preparing legislation that will be introduced into the U.S. Senate later this year.
    Visit the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument website. Read President Obama’sproclamationestablishing the Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument.

    Antiquities Act
    The Antiquities Act has been used by presidents to preserve extraordinary landscapes. All New Mexico sites are in bold. (Source: National Parks Service)
    Theodore Roosevelt
    Sept. 24, 1906: Devils Tower, Wyo.
    Dec. 8, 1906: El Morro
    Dec. 8, 1906: Montezuma Castle, AZ
    Dec. 8, 1906: Petrified Forest, AZ
    March 11, 1907: Chaco Canyon
    May 6,1907: Cinder Cone, Calif.
    May 6, 1907: Lassen Peak, Calif.
    Nov. 16, 1907: Gila Cliff Dwellings
    Dec. 19, 1907: Tonto, Ariz.
    Jan. 9, 1908: Muir Woods, Calif.
    Jan. 11, 1908: Grand Canyon, Ariz.
    Jan. 16, 1908: Pinnacles, Calif.
    Feb. 7, 1908: Jewel Cave, S.D.
    April 16, 1908: Natural Bridges, Utah
    May 11, 1908: Lewis and Clark Cavern, Mont.
    Sept. 15, 1908: Tumacacori, Ariz.
    Dec. 7, 1908: Wheeler, Colo.
    March 2, 1909: Mount Olympus, Wash.
    William Howard Taft
    March 20, 1909: Navajo, Ariz.
    July 12, 1909: Oregon Caves, Ore.
    July 31, 1909: Mukuntuweap, Utah
    Sept. 21, 1909: Shoshone Cavern, Wyo.
    Nov. 1, 1909: Gran Quivira (now Salinas Pueblo Missions)
    March 23, 1910: Sitka, Ark.
    May 30, 1910: Rainbow Bridge, Utah
    June 23, 1910: Big Hole Battlefield, Mont.
    May 24, 1911: Colorado, Colo.
    July 6, 1911: Devils Postpile, Calif.
    Woodrow Wilson
    Oct. 14, 1913: Cabrillo, Calif.
    Jan. 31, 1914: Papago Saguaro, Ariz.
    Oct. 4, 1915: Dinosaur, Utah-Colo.
    Nov. 30, 1915: Walnut Canyon, Ariz.
    Feb. 11, 1916: Bandelier
    July 8, 1916: Sieur de Monts, Maine
    Aug. 9, 1916: Capulin Mountain (now Capulin Volcano)
    Oct. 25, 1916: Old Kasaan, Alaska
    June 29, 1917: Verendrye, N.D.
    March 18, 1918: Zion, Utah (incorporated Mukuntuweap, Utah.)
    Aug. 3, 1918: Casa Grande (now Casa Grande Ruins), Ariz.
    Sept. 24, 1918: Katmai, Alaska
    Dec. 12, 1919: Scotts Bluff, Neb.
    Dec. 12, 1919: Yucca House, Colo.
    Warren G. Harding
    Jan. 24, 1922: Lehman Caves, Nev.
    Oct. 14, 1922: Timpanogos Cave, Utah
    Oct. 21, 1922: Fossil Cycad, S.D.
    Jan. 24, 1923: Aztec Ruin (now Aztec Ruins)
    March 2, 1923: Hovenweep, Utah-Colo.
    March 2, 1923: Mound City Group, Ohio
    May 31, 1923: Pipe Spring, Ariz.
    June 8, 1923: Bryce Canyon, Utah
    Calvin Coolidge
    Oct. 25, 1923: Carlsbad Caverns
    April 18, 1924: Chiricahua, Ariz.
    May 2, 1924: Craters of the Moon, Idaho
    Oct. 15, 1924: Castle Pinckney, S.C.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Marion (now Castillo de San Marcos), Fla.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Matanzas, Fla.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Fort Pulaski, Ga.
    Oct. 15, 1924: Statue of Liberty, N.Y.
    Dec. 9, 1924: Wupatki, Ariz.
    Feb. 26, 1925: Glacier Bay, Alaska
    Feb. 26, 1925: Meriwether Lewis, Tenn.
    Sept. 5, 1925: Father Millet Cross, N.Y.
    Nov. 21, 1925: Lava Beds, Calif.
    Herbert Hoover
    April 12, 1929: Arches, Utah
    May 11, 1929: Holy Cross, Colo.
    May 26, 1930: Sunset Crater (now Sunset Crater Volcano), Ariz.
    March 17, 1932: Great Sand Dunes, Colo.
    Dec. 22, 1932: Grand Canyon, Ariz.
    Jan. 18, 1933: White Sands
    Feb. 11, 1933: Death Valley, Calif.-Nev.
    March 1, 1933: Saguaro, Ariz.
    March 3, 1933: Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colo.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt
    April 26, 1933: Channel Islands, Calif.
    Aug. 22, 1933: Cedar Breaks, Utah
    Jan. 4, 1935: Fort Jefferson, Fla.
    Aug. 10, 1936: Joshua Tree, Calif.
    Jan 22, 1937: Zion, Utah
    April 4, 1937: Organ Pipe Cactus, Ariz.
    Aug. 2, 1937: Capitol Reef, Utah
    July 16, 1938: Fort Laramie, Wyo.
    May 17, 1939: Santa Rosa Island, Fla.
    July 24, 1939: Tuzigoot, Ariz.
    March 15, 1943: Jackson Hole, Wyo.
    Harry S. Truman
    Oct. 25, 1949: Effigy Mounds, Iowa
    Dwight D. Eisenhower
    July 15, 1956: Edison Laboratory, N.J.
    Jan. 18, 1961: Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Md-W.Va.
    John F. Kennedy
    May 11, 1961: Russell Cave, Ala.
    Dec. 28, 1961: Buck Island Reef, Virgin Islands
    Lyndon B. Johnson
    Jan. 20, 1969: Marble Canyon, Ariz.
    Jimmy Carter
    Dec. 1, 1978: Admiralty Island, Alaska (Forest Service)
    Dec. 1, 1978: Aniakchak, Alaska
    Dec.1, 1978: Becharof, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Bering Land Bridge, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Cape Krusenstern, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Denali, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Gates of the Arctic, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Kenai Fjords, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Kobuk Valley, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Lake Clark, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Misty Fjords, Alaska (Forest Service)
    Dec. 1, 1978: Noatak, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Wrangell-St. Elias, Alaska
    Dec.1, 1978: Yukon-Charley, Alaska
    Dec. 1, 1978: Yukon Flats, Alaska
    William J. Clinton
    Sept. 18, 1996: Grand Staircase-Escalante, Utah (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan.11, 2000: Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Ariz. (Jointly managed by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 10, 2000: Pinnacles National Monument, Calif. (Expansion)
    Jan. 11, 2000: Agua Fria National Monument, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 11, 2000: California Coastal National Monument, Calif. (Bureau of Land Management)
    April 15, 2000: Giant Sequoia National Monument, Calif. (Expansion – USDA Forest Service)
    June 9, 2000: Hanford Reach, Wash. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
    June 9, 2000: Ironwood Forest, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    June 9, 2000: Canyons of the Ancients, Colo. (Bureau of Land Management)
    June 9, 2000: Cascade-Siskiyou, Ore. (Bureau of Land Management)
    July 7, 2000: President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument (Armed Forces Retirement Home)
    Nov. 9, 2000: Craters of the Moon, Idaho (Expansion of Existing Monument)
    Nov. 9, 2000: Vermillion Cliffs, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Carrizo Plain, CA (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Minidoka Internment, Idaho
    Jan. 17, 2001: Pompeys Piller, Mont. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Sonoran Desert National Monument, Ariz. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, Mont. (Bureau of Land Management)
    Jan. 17, 2001: Virgin Islands Coral Reef, Virgin Islands
    Jan. 20, 2001: Governors Island-Castle Williams and Fort Jay, N.Y.
    George W. Bush
    Feb. 27, 2006: African Burial Ground National Monument, N.Y.
    June 15, 2006: Papahanaumokuakea Hawaii Islands Marine National Monument. Hawaii
    Dec. 5, 2008: World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument (Incorporated USS Arizona Memorial), Hawaii

  • New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
    Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
    Public contact: (505) 476-8000
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    FARMINGTON – New Mexico’s Off-highway Vehicle Advisory Board wants to hear from riders in the Farmington locale. To do that it scheduled an Oct. 24 “listening session” to facilitate an exchange of ideas and information. The 6-8 p.m. meeting will be at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington. 

    In addition to meeting new members of the advisory board, the public can learn about its purpose and how the program is managed by the Department of Game and Fish and the State Game Commission. The Department was given authority for the program in 2009.

    The program is funded through vehicle registrations, both resident and nonresident. More information is available on the Off-Highway Vehicle web page, www.B4URide.com.

    Governor Susana Martinez appointed several new members to the advisory board in recent weeks. Recent appointments are: John Diamond of Winston; Rick Alcon of Albuquerque, and Randy Jones of Jemez Springs. Gerald Chacon of Espanola was reappointed to the board, and Ron Schubert of Rio Rancho is serving through 2015.

  • Tue, Apr 23, 2013

    New Mexico’s U.S. senators renewed an effort Monday to make the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area in the Carson National Forest into an official wilderness.

    The legislation is the same as a bill introduced in last session’s Congress, according to a news release from Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, as well as U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján, who expects to introduce an identical bill in the House today.

    Besides granting wilderness status to about 45,000 acres in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Taos County, the bill also would add about 650 acres to the Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area, bringing it to some 19,550 acres.

    “For more than 30 years we have considered the Columbine Hondo’s economic, recreational and scenic values for protection,” said Udall in the news release. “And Taos County locals resoundingly agree that this area is deserving of permanent wilderness status. Designating the Columbine-Hondo as wilderness will only increase profitable tourism opportunities and provide for continued traditional land uses, such as hunting and grazing.”

    That land had been a wilderness study area since 1980, but no final report was issued or any action taken since then. The wilderness designation is supported by the Taos County Commission, Taos Pueblo, the towns of Taos and Red River, villages of Questa and Taos Ski Valley, Taos County Chamber of Commerce and others, according to the news release.

    “The people of Taos and the surrounding communities have made it clear that protecting the Columbine-Hondo is a top priority,” Luján said.

    This effort follows President Barack Obama last month designating 240,000 acres in Taos and Rio Arriba County, known as Rio Grande del Norte, a national monument.

    The proposed Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act also transfers some National Forest land to the town of Red River and village of Taos Ski Valley. That land contains two wastewater treatment plants, a cemetery, a local park and a portion of a town road.

    It also authorizes the Forest Service to sell two parcels of developed land in and near Red River. An updated survey showed that the development was a trespass on Forest Service lands.

  • Tue, Apr 23, 2013

    New Mexico’s U.S. senators renewed an effort Monday to make the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area in the Carson National Forest into an official wilderness.

    The legislation is the same as a bill introduced in last session’s Congress, according to a news release from Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, as well as U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján, who expects to introduce an identical bill in the House today.

    Besides granting wilderness status to about 45,000 acres in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Taos County, the bill also would add about 650 acres to the Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area, bringing it to some 19,550 acres.

    “For more than 30 years we have considered the Columbine Hondo’s economic, recreational and scenic values for protection,” said Udall in the news release. “And Taos County locals resoundingly agree that this area is deserving of permanent wilderness status. Designating the Columbine-Hondo as wilderness will only increase profitable tourism opportunities and provide for continued traditional land uses, such as hunting and grazing.”

    That land had been a wilderness study area since 1980, but no final report was issued or any action taken since then. The wilderness designation is supported by the Taos County Commission, Taos Pueblo, the towns of Taos and Red River, villages of Questa and Taos Ski Valley, Taos County Chamber of Commerce and others, according to the news release.

    “The people of Taos and the surrounding communities have made it clear that protecting the Columbine-Hondo is a top priority,” Luján said.

    This effort follows President Barack Obama last month designating 240,000 acres in Taos and Rio Arriba County, known as Rio Grande del Norte, a national monument.

    The proposed Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Act also transfers some National Forest land to the town of Red River and village of Taos Ski Valley. That land contains two wastewater treatment plants, a cemetery, a local park and a portion of a town road.

    It also authorizes the Forest Service to sell two parcels of developed land in and near Red River. An updated survey showed that the development was a trespass on Forest Service lands.

  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    New genes, new populations, new recovery plan crucial to Mexican gray wolf survival

    TUCSON (September 4, 2013) – Vast majorities in both Arizona and New Mexico strongly support continued efforts to restore Mexican gray wolves to the American southwest, according to a new poll released by Defenders of Wildlife. The poll comes as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is considering new proposals that would hamper Mexican gray wolf recovery and scheduling regional hearings to obtain public input on the proposal.

    The poll, conducted last month for Defenders by Tulchin Research, shows that the majority of New Mexicans and Arizonans want to see wolves not just survive, but thrive, and want the FWS to take additional steps to ensure their continued recovery.

    • 87% of voters in both states agree that wolves are a “vital part of America’s wilderness and natural heritage.”
    • 8 in 10 voters agree that the FWS should make every effort to prevent extinction.
    • 82% of Arizona voters and 74% of New Mexico voters agree there should be a science-based recovery plan.
    • Over two-thirds of voters in both states agree with scientists who say there are too few Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico and that we need to reintroduce two new populations of wolves in suitable habitat in the states.

    “Americans in the southwest see wolves as a vital part of the local landscape and they want efforts to restore them to continue,” said Eva Sargent, Southwest director for Defenders of Wildlife. “The Fish and Wildlife Service can make this happen if they let science rule the day and refuse to kowtow to the small minority in the region who oppose wolf recovery under any circumstances.”

    The FWS current proposal would jeopardize wolf recovery by establishing artificial boundaries around wolf habitat, leaving excellent habitat outside these boundaries. Currently, wolves must remain within invisible boundaries in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico. If they establish territories outside this area, they are trapped and moved back, which scientists say is a hindrance to recovery. The new proposal would expand these boundaries, but would still capture and return any wolf that so much as strays outside.

    “The Service continues to want to keep the wolves boxed in between arbitrary lines on a map,” said Sargent.“They are proposing a bigger box, but it’s still a box. If they are going to survive, we need to let wolves be wolves and allow them to live in suitable habitat throughout the region.”
    Scientists also say that to recover, there need to be more releases of new wolves to strengthen the gene pool as well as new populations established in different areas of the Southwest, with dispersal allowed between those populations.

    “By the late 1970s, the Mexican gray wolf was nearly eradicated and because today’s 75 wild individuals are all descended from the only seven wolves saved at that time, their genetic health has been severely compromised,” said Phil Hedrick, a geneticist and former Mexican gray wolf recovery team expert. “The Service knows this, and we have made it clear that if a recovery plan is not completed and implemented immediately, one which allows for dispersal, these animals cannot recover.”

    The Service has announced that it will hold a public meeting to take comments that will help to determine the fate of these iconic, imperiled animals. The hearing will be held on Friday, October 4, 2013 in Albuquerque, NM. Defenders of Wildlife will host an open house for wolf advocates in advance of the meeting and members will be on hand to help attendees submit written and oral comments in hopes that we can make the Service hear the desperate howl of the Mexican gray wolf.

    “If there’s one thing the Mexican gray wolves have on their side, it’s good objective scientists who are figuring out how to save them,” says Sargent. “What they don’t have is time. The Service must hear what science tells us the wolves need – access to suitable habitat in the Grand Canyon ecoregion and Northern New Mexico/Southern Colorado, new genes, and help establishing additional populations. When we give wolves our best effort, they return the favor by making landscapes healthier for everyone.”

  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    New genes, new populations, new recovery plan crucial to Mexican gray wolf survival

    TUCSON (September 4, 2013) – Vast majorities in both Arizona and New Mexico strongly support continued efforts to restore Mexican gray wolves to the American southwest, according to a new poll released by Defenders of Wildlife. The poll comes as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is considering new proposals that would hamper Mexican gray wolf recovery and scheduling regional hearings to obtain public input on the proposal.

    The poll, conducted last month for Defenders by Tulchin Research, shows that the majority of New Mexicans and Arizonans want to see wolves not just survive, but thrive, and want the FWS to take additional steps to ensure their continued recovery.

    • 87% of voters in both states agree that wolves are a “vital part of America’s wilderness and natural heritage.”
    • 8 in 10 voters agree that the FWS should make every effort to prevent extinction.
    • 82% of Arizona voters and 74% of New Mexico voters agree there should be a science-based recovery plan.
    • Over two-thirds of voters in both states agree with scientists who say there are too few Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico and that we need to reintroduce two new populations of wolves in suitable habitat in the states.

    “Americans in the southwest see wolves as a vital part of the local landscape and they want efforts to restore them to continue,” said Eva Sargent, Southwest director for Defenders of Wildlife. “The Fish and Wildlife Service can make this happen if they let science rule the day and refuse to kowtow to the small minority in the region who oppose wolf recovery under any circumstances.”

    The FWS current proposal would jeopardize wolf recovery by establishing artificial boundaries around wolf habitat, leaving excellent habitat outside these boundaries. Currently, wolves must remain within invisible boundaries in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico. If they establish territories outside this area, they are trapped and moved back, which scientists say is a hindrance to recovery. The new proposal would expand these boundaries, but would still capture and return any wolf that so much as strays outside.

    “The Service continues to want to keep the wolves boxed in between arbitrary lines on a map,” said Sargent.“They are proposing a bigger box, but it’s still a box. If they are going to survive, we need to let wolves be wolves and allow them to live in suitable habitat throughout the region.”
    Scientists also say that to recover, there need to be more releases of new wolves to strengthen the gene pool as well as new populations established in different areas of the Southwest, with dispersal allowed between those populations.

    “By the late 1970s, the Mexican gray wolf was nearly eradicated and because today’s 75 wild individuals are all descended from the only seven wolves saved at that time, their genetic health has been severely compromised,” said Phil Hedrick, a geneticist and former Mexican gray wolf recovery team expert. “The Service knows this, and we have made it clear that if a recovery plan is not completed and implemented immediately, one which allows for dispersal, these animals cannot recover.”

    The Service has announced that it will hold a public meeting to take comments that will help to determine the fate of these iconic, imperiled animals. The hearing will be held on Friday, October 4, 2013 in Albuquerque, NM. Defenders of Wildlife will host an open house for wolf advocates in advance of the meeting and members will be on hand to help attendees submit written and oral comments in hopes that we can make the Service hear the desperate howl of the Mexican gray wolf.

    “If there’s one thing the Mexican gray wolves have on their side, it’s good objective scientists who are figuring out how to save them,” says Sargent. “What they don’t have is time. The Service must hear what science tells us the wolves need – access to suitable habitat in the Grand Canyon ecoregion and Northern New Mexico/Southern Colorado, new genes, and help establishing additional populations. When we give wolves our best effort, they return the favor by making landscapes healthier for everyone.”

  • The Santa Fe New Mexican
    Saturday, October 26, 2013

    By Karen Denison 

    One of America’s best ideas has been the dedication of public lands for citizens to use — not only because of financially valuable resources but for their place in our collective history and traditions. Sportsmen (and women) have been among the staunchest fighters for continuing access and protection of these special places. That’s true, in part, because we have been able to experience firsthand, especially here in the West, hunting, fishing and other traditional outdoor pursuits over large areas of public lands.

    Before the government shutdown, three bills had been introduced before Congress to help ensure continuing protection and access for the public. We hope that our delegation again may take up these matters of interest to New Mexicans.

    Sen. Martin Heinrich’s HUNT Act (S. 1554) seeks to improve legal access to public property. By dedicating 1.5 percent of the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund to purchasing easements and rights of way from willing landowners, this legislation would unlock a significant acreage of public lands that currently lack legal entrance except across private land. Providing public access benefits those who visit but can also significantly benefit local economies.

    The Public Lands Renewable Energy Development Act (S. 279) would institute a royalty formula for renewable energy revenues generated on public lands. A share of revenues would go to the state, the county and (importantly for sportsmen) to a fund that would offset the impacts of renewable projects on habitat. Senate Bill 279 is common-sense legislation for New Mexico because of our plentiful public lands and our enormous potential as a utility-scale producer of clean energy. For this reason, Sens. Tom Udall and Heinrich and Reps. Steve Pearce, Ben Ray Luján and Michelle Lujan Grisham are all cosponsors. This bill has bipartisan support, in other words.

    Heinrich and Udall have also introduced Senate Bill 285, a bill that would transfer management of the Valles Caldera National Preserve to the National Park Service. As a professional guide, I believe the NPS provides the best model for improving access for all the available recreational activities on the Valles Caldera (including continued fishing and hunting), while protecting those qualities that make this area a New Mexico gem. The preserve’s current model of science-based adaptive management would be retained. Cutting-edge research currently being conducted by the staff could continue while public access would be improved, especially for citizens of modest means, to the significant benefit of the state and local economy. No other agency is demonstrating as well the ability to balance the issues of protection and access for traditional sportsmen that such a wonderful place deserves.

    We are fortunate here in New Mexico to be in close contact with the natural landscapes that help sustain and shape our souls, our traditions and even our wallets. Preserving a balance, which currently seems so difficult in Washington, D.C., is the business of all of us.

    Karen Denison is the owner of Outspire Hiking and Snowshoeing.

  • The White House
    Office of the Press Secretary
    For Immediate Release
    August 30, 2013

    BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    A PROCLAMATION

    In September 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Wilderness Act into law, recognizing places “where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” Throughout our history, countless people have passed through America’s most treasured landscapes, leaving their beauty unmarred. This month, we uphold that proud tradition and resolve that future generations will trek forest paths, navigate winding rivers, and scale rocky peaks as visitors to the majesty of our great outdoors.

    My Administration is dedicated to preserving our Nation’s wild and scenic places. During my first year as President, I designated more than 2 million acres of wilderness and protected over 1,000 miles of rivers. Earlier this year, I established five new national monuments, and I signed legislation to redesignate California’s Pinnacles National Monument as Pinnacles National Park. To engage more Americans in conservation, I also launched the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative. Through this innovative effort, my Administration is working with communities from coast to coast to preserve our outdoor heritage, including our vast rural lands and remaining wild spaces.

    As natural habitats for diverse wildlife; as destinations for family camping trips; and as venues for hiking, hunting, and fishing, America’s wilderness landscapes hold boundless opportunities to discover and explore. They provide immense value to our Nation — in shared experiences and as an integral part of our economy. Our iconic wilderness areas draw tourists from across the country and around the world, bolstering local businesses and supporting American jobs.
    During National Wilderness Month, we reflect on the profound influence of the great outdoors on our lives and our national character, and we recommit to preserving them for generations to come.

    NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2013 as National Wilderness Month. I invite all Americans to visit and enjoy our wilderness areas, to learn about their vast history, and to aid in the protection of our precious national treasures.

    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

    BARACK OBAMA

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/08/30/presidential-proclamation-national-wilderness-month-2013

  • For Immediate Release

    AUGUST 20, 2013

    New Mexicans Ask the Federal Government to Consider Alternatives and Engage the Public

    For more information, contact:
    Judy Calman, Attorney, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, 505-843-8696 x102
    Arian Pregenzer, Affected Landowner, 505-620-1591
    Michael Casaus, The Wilderness Society, 505-417-5288

    Albuquerque, NM – Today, local residents, forest users, and other stakeholders asked the federal government to consider alternatives to its proposal to expand military operations on the Cibola National Forest in the Bear Mountains, north of Magdalena in Socorro County. The Forest Service is proposing to allow the military to conduct training exercises on national forest lands for possibly the next twenty years, and maybe longer. The training exercises would entail 4,378 flights and 26,230 maneuvers each year. This involves helicopter takeoffs and landings, flying in closed patterns over large areas, hovering just a couple of hundred feet off of the ground, and dropping of personnel or equipment. Additionally, ground operations are proposed, which include the firing of pyrotechnics such as simulated surface to air missiles, ground bursts, flares, and smoke grenades – all on public land.

    The proposed location includes part of a Forest Service Roadless Area, and provides in island of wildlife habitat and hunting opportunities. It is home to a variety of wildlife, including burrowing owls, mule deer, desert big horn sheep, black bear and elk.

    “I understand that the military must train its personnel, but simply can’t understand why the Defense Department doesn’t use its own land for this important mission, given that there are over 3 million acres of military lands in New Mexico set aside for this very purpose,” wondered Arian Pregenzer, a nearby landowner. Kirtland AFB, Holloman AFB, White Sands Missile Range, and Fort Bliss control nearly 5,500 square miles in New Mexico – about the size of Connecticut.

    “With so much land under its control, surely the military can find a few hundred acres to use for this training,” concluded Pregenzer. “Yet the proposal does not even consider the option of conducting training exercises on military land.”

    In a letter to the Forest Service conservation groups including New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, Backcountry Horsemen of New Mexico, Sierra Club, New Mexico Sportsmen, and The Wilderness Society, asked the agency to consider alternatives that would provide training opportunities and better protect the National Forest and its wildlife. This includes considering an alternative that would site the military training exercises on military lands.

    The letter also asked the Forest Service to extend the comment period because 30 days was too short a time for anyone to read and absorb the 700+ page proposal. Lastly, the groups requested that the Forest Service hold public meetings to provide additional opportunities for stakeholders to learn about and comment on the proposal, since few nearby landowners were aware of the proposed military operations. Yesterday, the Forest Service refused these written requests.

    “Twenty years of intense military operations on our national forest land is a big deal,” exclaimed Judy Calman of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. “It certainly deserves a conversation with nearby residents and forest stakeholders, and a more thoughtful analysis.”

    For more information, see http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/fs-usda-pop.php?project=5375. In particular, see the summary tables and maps in the Environmental Assessment Volume 1, Chapters 2 and 3.

  • For Immediate Release
    August 20, 2013

    New Mexicans Ask the Federal Government to Consider Alternatives and Engage the Public

    For more information, contact:
    Judy Calman, Attorney, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, 505-843-8696 x102
    Arian Pregenzer, Affected Landowner, 505-620-1591
    Michael Casaus, The Wilderness Society, 505-417-5288

    Albuquerque, NM – Today, local residents, forest users, and other stakeholders asked the federal government to consider alternatives to its proposal to expand military operations on the Cibola National Forest in the Bear Mountains, north of Magdalena in Socorro County. The Forest Service is proposing to allow the military to conduct training exercises on national forest lands for possibly the next twenty years, and maybe longer. The training exercises would entail 4,378 flights and 26,230 maneuvers each year. This involves helicopter takeoffs and landings, flying in closed patterns over large areas, hovering just a couple of hundred feet off of the ground, and dropping of personnel or equipment. Additionally, ground operations are proposed, which include the firing of pyrotechnics such as simulated surface to air missiles, ground bursts, flares, and smoke grenades – all on public land.

    The proposed location includes part of a Forest Service Roadless Area, and provides in island of wildlife habitat and hunting opportunities. It is home to a variety of wildlife, including burrowing owls, mule deer, desert big horn sheep, black bear and elk.

    “I understand that the military must train its personnel, but simply can’t understand why the Defense Department doesn’t use its own land for this important mission, given that there are over 3 million acres of military lands in New Mexico set aside for this very purpose,” wondered Arian Pregenzer, a nearby landowner. Kirtland AFB, Holloman AFB, White Sands Missile Range, and Fort Bliss control nearly 5,500 square miles in New Mexico – about the size of Connecticut.

    “With so much land under its control, surely the military can find a few hundred acres to use for this training,” concluded Pregenzer. “Yet the proposal does not even consider the option of conducting training exercises on military land.”

    In a letter to the Forest Service conservation groups including New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, Backcountry Horsemen of New Mexico, Sierra Club, New Mexico Sportsmen, and The Wilderness Society, asked the agency to consider alternatives that would provide training opportunities and better protect the National Forest and its wildlife. This includes considering an alternative that would site the military training exercises on military lands.

    The letter also asked the Forest Service to extend the comment period because 30 days was too short a time for anyone to read and absorb the 700+ page proposal. Lastly, the groups requested that the Forest Service hold public meetings to provide additional opportunities for stakeholders to learn about and comment on the proposal, since few nearby landowners were aware of the proposed military operations. Yesterday, the Forest Service refused these written requests.

    “Twenty years of intense military operations on our national forest land is a big deal,” exclaimed Judy Calman of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. “It certainly deserves a conversation with nearby residents and forest stakeholders, and a more thoughtful analysis.”

    For more information, see http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/fs-usda-pop.php?project=5375. In particular, see the summary tables and maps in the Environmental Assessment Volume 1, Chapters 2 and 3.

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  • E&E News
    September 4, 2013

    The Bureau of Land Management yesterday released its environmental assessment of leasing land for oil and natural gas development in New Mexico, recommending that the number of parcels leased to industry should be limited.

    Initially, the oil and gas industry asked that 38 parcels of land near the Chaco Culture National Historical Park be leased for development, which amounts to more than 19,000 acres. One parcel was less than a quarter-mile from the park.

    BLM has proposed that the parcels to be leased be cut down to just four.

    Critics, including Arizona’s Hopi Tribe, have said that drilling in the area would harm environmental and archaeological resources at the site. BLM officials said they worked with tribes before releasing their assessment (AP/Albuquerque Journal, Sept. 4).

  • E&E News
    September 4, 2013

    The Bureau of Land Management yesterday released its environmental assessment of leasing land for oil and natural gas development in New Mexico, recommending that the number of parcels leased to industry should be limited.

    Initially, the oil and gas industry asked that 38 parcels of land near the Chaco Culture National Historical Park be leased for development, which amounts to more than 19,000 acres. One parcel was less than a quarter-mile from the park.

    BLM has proposed that the parcels to be leased be cut down to just four.

    Critics, including Arizona’s Hopi Tribe, have said that drilling in the area would harm environmental and archaeological resources at the site. BLM officials said they worked with tribes before releasing their assessment (AP/Albuquerque Journal, Sept. 4).

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