NMW Logo 20th CMYK tight crop

2015

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Help protect the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf with your artwork

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance invites submissions for the 2015 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.  Artists worldwide are invited to enter two-dimensional drawings, paintings, or photographs featuring the Mexican gray wolf.  The winning artwork will be featured on the 2015 stamp that will be sold to raise funds to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects.  All artwork must be scalable to the size of the stamp, 4.5-inches wide by 5.5-inches tall.  Please submit electronic images of original artwork by February 28, 2015 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance issued its first Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp in 2011. This collectible stamp is similar to the US Fish and Wildlife’s duck stamp, which funds wetlands conservation, but the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is in no way related to hunting. All proceeds from sales of the wolf stamp directly benefit activities to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects. The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color stamp is sold exclusively through NM Wild and is a framing-quality print for collectors.

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Help protect the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf with your artwork

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance invites submissions for the 2015 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.  Artists worldwide are invited to enter two-dimensional drawings, paintings, or photographs featuring the Mexican gray wolf.  The winning artwork will be featured on the 2015 stamp that will be sold to raise funds to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects.  All artwork must be scalable to the size of the stamp, 4.5-inches wide by 5.5-inches tall.  Please submit electronic images of original artwork by February 28, 2015 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance issued its first Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp in 2011. This collectible stamp is similar to the US Fish and Wildlife’s duck stamp, which funds wetlands conservation, but the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is in no way related to hunting. All proceeds from sales of the wolf stamp directly benefit activities to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects. The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color stamp is sold exclusively through NM Wild and is a framing-quality print for collectors.

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Help protect the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf with your artwork

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance invites submissions for the 2015 Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp.  Artists worldwide are invited to enter two-dimensional drawings, paintings, or photographs featuring the Mexican gray wolf.  The winning artwork will be featured on the 2015 stamp that will be sold to raise funds to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects.  All artwork must be scalable to the size of the stamp, 4.5-inches wide by 5.5-inches tall.  Please submit electronic images of original artwork by February 28, 2015 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance issued its first Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp in 2011. This collectible stamp is similar to the US Fish and Wildlife’s duck stamp, which funds wetlands conservation, but the Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is in no way related to hunting. All proceeds from sales of the wolf stamp directly benefit activities to support Mexican wolf conservation and education projects. The 4.5×5.5 inch full-color stamp is sold exclusively through NM Wild and is a framing-quality print for collectors.

  • For Immediate Release
    April 6,2015

    Contact: Alma Castro 
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    NM Wilderness Alliance launches 5th international Mexican gray wolf collector’s stamp 

    This year’s stamp—chosen from more than 50 entries—inspired by Albuquerque native wolf

     

    2015 Wolf StampAlbuquerque—April 6, 2015— The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance just released its 5th international collector’s stamp commemorating the Mexican gray wolf.

    Each year, artists from across the country submit their artwork to the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, who organizes the contest.

    This year’s stamp design, inspired by a former Albuquerque resident Gypsy the wolf, was chosen from more than 50 entries.

    Gypsy, a female Mexican gray wolf, was born in 2004 at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, as part of the Species Survival Plan and has been a resident of Wolf Haven International in Washington since 2005.

    Says artist Skie Bender, “I’ve always been fond of Gypsy for her gregarious albeit shy and curious energy.”

    The Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is a framing-quality conservation stamp. Native to the Southwest, the Mexican gray wolf—or lobo—was reintroduced to the wild more than 17 years ago through a captive breeding program, yet still struggles to survive with only 109 left in the wild. All proceeds from the stamp benefit Mexican gray wolf conservation and education efforts.

    To purchase the 2015 stamp as well as previous years’ stamps, visit nmwild.org/purchasewolfstamp

    About the artist: Bender is Education Outreach Specialist at Wolf Haven International, a nonprofit sanctuary for captive-born wolves, located in the small farming community of Tenino, Wash. Bender exhibits her artwork throughout the west and Pacific Northwest. She connects her love for animals with her passion for art by donating proceeds of her paintings to various animal rescue organizations.

  • For Immediate Release
    April 6,2015

    Contact: Alma Castro 
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    NM Wilderness Alliance launches 5th international Mexican gray wolf collector’s stamp 

    This year’s stamp—chosen from more than 50 entries—inspired by Albuquerque native wolf

     

    2015 Wolf StampAlbuquerque—April 6, 2015— The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance just released its 5th international collector’s stamp commemorating the Mexican gray wolf.

    Each year, artists from across the country submit their artwork to the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, who organizes the contest.

    This year’s stamp design, inspired by a former Albuquerque resident Gypsy the wolf, was chosen from more than 50 entries.

    Gypsy, a female Mexican gray wolf, was born in 2004 at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, as part of the Species Survival Plan and has been a resident of Wolf Haven International in Washington since 2005.

    Says artist Skie Bender, “I’ve always been fond of Gypsy for her gregarious albeit shy and curious energy.”

    The Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is a framing-quality conservation stamp. Native to the Southwest, the Mexican gray wolf—or lobo—was reintroduced to the wild more than 17 years ago through a captive breeding program, yet still struggles to survive with only 109 left in the wild. All proceeds from the stamp benefit Mexican gray wolf conservation and education efforts.

    To purchase the 2015 stamp as well as previous years’ stamps, visit nmwild.org/purchasewolfstamp

    About the artist: Bender is Education Outreach Specialist at Wolf Haven International, a nonprofit sanctuary for captive-born wolves, located in the small farming community of Tenino, Wash. Bender exhibits her artwork throughout the west and Pacific Northwest. She connects her love for animals with her passion for art by donating proceeds of her paintings to various animal rescue organizations.

  • For Immediate Release
    April 6,2015

    Contact: Alma Castro 
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    505-843-8696, ext. 104

    NM Wilderness Alliance launches 5th international Mexican gray wolf collector’s stamp 

    This year’s stamp—chosen from more than 50 entries—inspired by Albuquerque native wolf

     

    2015 Wolf StampAlbuquerque—April 6, 2015— The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance just released its 5th international collector’s stamp commemorating the Mexican gray wolf.

    Each year, artists from across the country submit their artwork to the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, who organizes the contest.

    This year’s stamp design, inspired by a former Albuquerque resident Gypsy the wolf, was chosen from more than 50 entries.

    Gypsy, a female Mexican gray wolf, was born in 2004 at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, as part of the Species Survival Plan and has been a resident of Wolf Haven International in Washington since 2005.

    Says artist Skie Bender, “I’ve always been fond of Gypsy for her gregarious albeit shy and curious energy.”

    The Mexican Wolf Conservation Stamp is a framing-quality conservation stamp. Native to the Southwest, the Mexican gray wolf—or lobo—was reintroduced to the wild more than 17 years ago through a captive breeding program, yet still struggles to survive with only 109 left in the wild. All proceeds from the stamp benefit Mexican gray wolf conservation and education efforts.

    To purchase the 2015 stamp as well as previous years’ stamps, visit nmwild.org/purchasewolfstamp

    About the artist: Bender is Education Outreach Specialist at Wolf Haven International, a nonprofit sanctuary for captive-born wolves, located in the small farming community of Tenino, Wash. Bender exhibits her artwork throughout the west and Pacific Northwest. She connects her love for animals with her passion for art by donating proceeds of her paintings to various animal rescue organizations.

  • Easier and more affordable access is coming to the Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains.

    And that means more people will be able to enjoy the 89,0000-acre preserve that features stunning mountain peaks, meandering streams, soaring views, vast plains and opportunities to fish, hike and photograph – and when in-season hunt wildlife – on the former Baca Ranch the U.S. government purchased in 2000.

    Come October, management of the preserve will pass to the National Park Service. To date it has been managed by a trust, with access limited and expensive.

    The new rules and fees were developed in collaboration with the Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service and tribal and pueblo partners.

    Under the new format approved by the Valles Caldera Trust Board of Trustees, the entrance fee will be $20 per vehicle and $10 per person for hikers or bicyclists – valid for seven days for all self-guided recreational activities including hiking, fishing, mountain biking and horseback riding. Special events, guided hikes, van tours and the use of the headquarters shuttle will also be free with entry.

    The Valles Caldera opens Friday. It is a treasure, and care must be taken to preserve its integrity and beauty. But at the same time, the people who own it – U.S. citizens – should get to enjoy it to the extent possible as long as they do so respectfully. This plan looks like a winner from all viewpoints.

    This editorial first appeared in the Albuquerque Journal. It was written by members of the editorial board and is unsigned as it represents the opinion of the newspaper rather than the writers.

  • Senate Memorial 40, which opposed any new wilderness in the Pecos, was tabled in the Senate Rules Committee on Friday, March 6. Six Pecos supporters testified in opposition; nobody was there in support.

    Support for the Pecos expansion proposal is widespread and diverse, including the Pueblos of Nambe, Picuris, Pojoaque and Taos, City of Santa Fe, Mora and Santa Fe counties, almost 300 local businesses, and dozens of sportsmen and conservation organizations who represent tens of thousands of New Mexicans.

    After the public testimony, Griego decided to pull the bill, saying, “this memorial was created and brought before this committee to start and to create discussions amongst all these advocates who are opposing this memorial; to create, again, a discussion to allow these ranchers and these farmers to express their opinions and I think we’ve done that Madam Chair. We’ve heard from all the opposition here. I don’t want to put the members here at risk to vote on this memorial because this memorial was only done to create a discussion. And I know we’ve gotten a couple of Op-Eds in the newspaper, both for and against, and that has created a discussion based on this memorial. So with that, Madam Chairman, what I’m going to ask, is I’m going to ask members of the committee to pull this memorial and to allow us to continue the discussion, outside the committee room, and then maybe to make sure that we come back with either a memorial, where we have reached agreement in regards to the wilderness.”

    NM Wild would like to thank all of our members who called and sent e-mails to the Senate Rules Committee. Your voice makes all the difference.

  • Public News Service-NM: January 6, 2015

    The oil and gas industry in New Mexico is a big deal. It supports the state budget with hundreds of millions of dollars each year. But there are impacts, too – on air quality, water, public health and even cultural sites. In the first installment of KUNM’s new series Drilling Deep, we explore northwestern New Mexico – and the Chacoan landscape.

    Listen to the streaming audio:


  • By

    Regarding the article “Speakers oppose new wilderness areas in Sandias,” published in the Journal on Aug. 7, I write to clarify several points about the Cibola National Forest’s Forest Management Plan revision with respect to the Sandia Mountains.

    While the Forest Service and the Sandia Landscape team did an excellent job facilitating the meeting, it is clear that some of the concerns expressed were based on confusion about the process itself.

    In particular, the mountain bikers present were concerned about losing their access to biking trails if any additional wilderness is designated in the foothill areas abutting the Sandia Wilderness.

    While it is true that mountain biking is not allowed in designated wilderness areas per the Wilderness Act of 1964, there is no proposal by the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance to expand the current boundaries of the Sandia Wilderness or within the Sandia Ranger District.

    The Forest Service is not designating wilderness during this process nor is it legally able to do so administratively. The creation of designated wilderness – the gold standard of land conservation – requires an act of Congress. (A tough and rare thing to accomplish to be sure!)

    The Forest Service is, however, legally obligated to inventory land for wilderness characteristics, to make a management decision about those areas through the planning process, and to eventually recommend areas, if any, to Congress for possible designation.

    Each step of the planning process is subject to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act, meaning the Forest Service must take the public’s opinion into account and respond substantively to its concerns.

    Designated wilderness is explored and enjoyed by a variety of groups, including hikers, backpackers, equestrians, birders, hunters and anglers. In addition to affording us these life-affirming recreational opportunities, wilderness honors New Mexico’s history and cultural heritage; protects our watersheds and air quality; provides critical habitat for threatened species and supports biodiversity; and promotes tourism and much-needed job creation.

    Wilderness is also important as an idea – to know that there are still places that exist that are essentially untrammeled – that knowledge enriches all of humanity, whether we personally visit it or not. But visit it we do – how fortunate we are to have the Sandia wilderness as our backyard!

    With just 2 percent of New Mexico designated as wilderness, there are numerous opportunities outside of wilderness areas for those who prefer to enjoy the outdoors on a mountain bike or off-road vehicle.

    While the Wilderness Alliance is an unapologetic defender of New Mexico’s wild places and seeks to protect additional deserving national public lands currently under threat, I want to reiterate for those with concerns about losing existing mountain biking trails in the Sandias that there is a difference between the land management agency identifying potential areas as they are required to do and a formal proposal and campaign by citizen conservationists to actually pursue new wilderness designations.

    We strive to work with mountain bikers and other stakeholders to craft proposal boundaries and acreages taking into consideration existing mountain bike trails and other uses. And while we are not pursuing additional wilderness in the Sandias, I hope our mountain bike friends will support us in our efforts to protect the increasingly rare wild places in other parts of the state.

    We can’t afford to miss out on opportunities to preserve places that provide more value when managed and used in gentler ways. Thanks to everyone for caring about our national public lands and for participating in public meetings, submitting comments and considering a balance between recreation and the long-term importance of having wild areas for this and future generations for humans and other species alike.

  • Join representatives from the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

    in Carlsbad for a question and answer session

    We will focus on protecting BLM lands through the Resource Management Plan revision process

    Click Here for the Fact Sheet

    Carlsbad 640x480

  • Listen To Staff Attorney, Judy Calman

    talk about the dangers of geothermal exploration near our water sheds

    Audio Player

     
     
    00:00
     
    00:00
     

    The Santa Fe National Forest recently announced a public scoping period for a Forest Plan amendment which would consider making over 194,000 acres available for leasing for geothermal production immediately to the north and west of Valles Caldera National Preserve.

    The area being considered for leasing includes portions of nine Inventoried Roadless Areas and countless water sources, including all the springs visited and loved in the Jemez Ranger District. Inventoried Roadless Areas are places the Forest Service has determined contained wilderness characteristics, but which have not yet been permanently protected as wilderness by Congress.

    Not only is the timing wrong with the Santa Fe already going through a Forest Plan revision, it is also inappropriate and out of step with the agency’s mission to consider such a large impact to a forest which is so intensely used by sportsmen, hikers, and backpackers, and which contains wilderness-quality lands.

  • TUCSON, Ariz. — A group of conservation organizations has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its policies on Mexican gray wolves.

    The Western Environmental Law Center filed the suit in Tucson this week on behalf of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and Friends of Animals.

     

    The groups claim the federal government isn’t doing enough to protect Mexican wolves, an endangered species. They take issue with a final rule issued in January that caps the Mexican gray wolf population at 300 to 325 wolves, prevents wolves from colonizing in certain areas and allows more killing of the wolves by federal agents and private landowners.

    A survey released in February showed 109 wolves in Arizona and New Mexico, more than at any time since a reintroduction program began in 1998.

    SF New Mexican

    Lawsuit filed against U.S. over protections for rare wolf

    A coalition of environmental groups filed a lawsuit on Thursday against U.S. wildlife officials arguing that the government’s management plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf, one of the most imperiled mammals in North America, does not go far enough.

    The Western Environmental Law Center filed the suit on behalf of several organizations in a federal Arizona court, alleging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s plans for the wolves violate the Endangered Species Act and other laws.

    At issue is a final rule published in January that, while allowing more territory for the wolves to roam, also capped their population and provided more leeway to state wildlife agencies and others to kill the wolves to protect livestock as well as deer and elk herds prized by hunters.

    “Unfortunately, politics supplants wildlife biology in key parts of the USFWS Mexican gray wolf plan,” attorney John Mellgren of the Western Environmental Law Center said in a statement. “Our goal in this case is to put the science back into the management of Mexican wolves in the U.S.”

    The Fish and Wildlife Service declined to comment on the litigation.

    The agency ruled that 300 to 325 Mexican wolves would be needed in the U.S. Southwest for the animals to be considered recovered and stripped of protections under the federal Endangered Species Act.

    Conservationists counter that the revisions were still insufficient to guarantee a strong comeback and said a minimum of 750 were needed for the animal’s long-term survival.

    The number of imperiled wolves found only in the American Southwest climbed to 109 in 2014, marking the fourth consecutive year that the population of Mexican gray wolves has risen by at least 10 percent.

    But Bethany Cotton, the wildlife program director for WildEarth Guardians who is among the plaintiffs in the case, said the increase was “not nearly fast enough.”

    Wild Mexican wolves were believed to be all but extinct in the United States in 1998 when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began reintroducing the animal to its native range.

    In Mexico, the animals are believed to have been extinct in the wild since the 1980s. In 2014, wildlife managers there announced the first litter of wolf pups to be born in the wild since then, local media said, following reintroduction programs.

    (Reporting by Curtis Skinner in San Francisco; Additional reporting by Laura Zuckerman in Salmon, Idaho; Editing by Sandra Maler)

    Reuters

  • In this week’s edition of Earth Matters, the co-hosts of the program, Nathan Newcomer, Allyson Siwik and Donna Stevens provide a review of conservation efforts in 2014 and what we can look forward to moving into 2015.

    Among the issues discussed are the Gila River Diversion, 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Wild & Scenic designation for the Gila River, Travel Management, Hardrock Mining reforms, and USFS Planning Revision.

    Listen here.

  • CLICK BELOW TO LISTEN

    Audio Player

     
     
    00:00
     
    00:00
     

    In this week’s edition of Earth Matters, co-producer Nathan Newcomer interviews students from the Aldo Leopold Charter School’s Eco-Monitoring Program.

    Based in Silver City, Aldo Leopold Charter School launched their Eco-Monitoring program several years ago to give students the opportunity to participate in gathering data in the U.S. National Forest. They discuss much of the important work that the students do, including collecting data on soils, aquatics, range, forest, and wildlife.

    They also discuss the importance of educating youth on the importance of conservation work, and how that translates into healthier communities and thriving local economies.

    Tune in to this week’s Earth Matters to learn more.

  • CLICK BELOW TO LISTEN

    Audio Player

     
     
    00:00
     
    00:00
     

    In this week’s edition of Earth Matters, co-producer Nathan Newcomer interviews students from the Aldo Leopold Charter School’s Eco-Monitoring Program.

    Based in Silver City, Aldo Leopold Charter School launched their Eco-Monitoring program several years ago to give students the opportunity to participate in gathering data in the U.S. National Forest. They discuss much of the important work that the students do, including collecting data on soils, aquatics, range, forest, and wildlife.

    They also discuss the importance of educating youth on the importance of conservation work, and how that translates into healthier communities and thriving local economies.

    Tune in to this week’s Earth Matters to learn more.

  • CLICK BELOW TO LISTEN

    Audio Player

     
     
    00:00
     
    00:00
     

    In this week’s edition of Earth Matters, co-producer Nathan Newcomer interviews students from the Aldo Leopold Charter School’s Eco-Monitoring Program.

    Based in Silver City, Aldo Leopold Charter School launched their Eco-Monitoring program several years ago to give students the opportunity to participate in gathering data in the U.S. National Forest. They discuss much of the important work that the students do, including collecting data on soils, aquatics, range, forest, and wildlife.

    They also discuss the importance of educating youth on the importance of conservation work, and how that translates into healthier communities and thriving local economies.

    Tune in to this week’s Earth Matters to learn more.

  • In this week’s edition of Earth Matters, Donna Stevens – Executive Director of UGWA / Upper Gila Watershed Alliance – interviews New Mexico Wilderness Alliance Gila Grassroots Organizer and Earth Matters co-host Nathan Newcomer on the Gila National Forest planning process.

    The Forest Plan is a document that guides all management decisions from grazing and mining to recreation and wildlife.  The current forest plan is over 30 years old so there are many issues to address – and baseline assumptions to revisit.

    Forest planning is a multi-year process and includes many opportunities for public comment and participation.  What does this mean for your national forest?  Listen to this interview to learn how you can get involved.

    Additional information on Forest planning is posted on the Gila National Forest website.

    LISTEN HERE.

  • In this installment of Earth Matters, Nathan Newcomer – Earth Matters co-producer and NM Wilderness Alliance Gila Grass Roots Organizer presents a recording of Terry Tempest Williams – keynote speaker at the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act conference in October 2014.

    Listen here.

Search