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Our wilderness around Las Cruces deserves protection

Las Cruces Sun-News
EDITORIAL

Our view: Our wilderness around Las Cruces deserves protection

09/26/2009

For some three decades now, the most pristine areas of the Organ Mountains and other natural treasurers just outside Las Cruces have been regulated under a federal designation that was intended to be temporary — a wilderness study area.

It seems to us there has been plenty of time for study, now it’s time for action. Last week, New Mexico’s two senators, Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, introduced a bill that would designate 259,000 acres as wilderness and place another 100,000 acres as a national conservation area. And on Tuesday, the Doña Ana County Commission threw its support behind the measure.

The land to be protected includes the Organ Mountains Wilderness and the Organ Mountains National Conservation Area west of Las Cruces; the Potrillo Mountains Wilderness, the Aden Lava Flow Wilderness, the Cinder Cone Wilderness and the Whitehorn Wilderness, all in southwestern Doña Ana County; and the Sierra de las Uvas Wilderness, the Broad Canyon Wilderness, the Robledo Mountains Wilderness and the Desert Peaks National Conservation Area, all south of Hatch and northwest of Las Cruces.

Introduction of the bill elicited the same arguments from the same adversaries that we’ve been hearing for years. Ranchers who work leased land in the designated areas are concerned that a wilderness designation could hamper their operations. They worry that they would restrict water projects, limit access to their herds and stock tanks and prevent them from making needed improvements to their operations.

We fully appreciate the importance of ranching to a diversified county economy and have no desire to see those operation diminished. If we believed a wilderness designation would have the dire consequences that have been predicted, we’d have second thoughts about offering our endorsement.

In fact, we see no reason why wilderness and ranching can’t co-exist. The federal designation has specific provisions designed to carve out the exemptions ranchers need to run their operations. We believe local ranchers would be better-served working with Bingaman and Udall to ensure that their needs are protected under the bill now being considered, rather than fighting to defeat the bill.

Without protection, these precious lands will be lost to the urban sprawl that will surely come to our area in the years ahead. With wilderness protection, they will be preserved to be enjoyed by future generations.

We commend Bingaman and Udall for introducing this important legislation, and urge all those who treasure these special areas to make your voices heard.

NEW Wilderness Radio Ad

Listen to a new radio ad that is running in southern New Mexico in support of the Organ Mountains – Desert Peaks Wilderness Act!

Organ Mountains Sites Deserve To Be Saved

Albuquerque Journal
EDITORIAL

Oct. 4, 2009

Organ Mountains Sites Deserve To Be Saved

The Organ Mountains provide a dramatic backdrop to the vibrant and growing community of Las Cruces, the state’s second largest city, much as the Sandias do to Albuquerque. More than 30 years ago, at the behest of now retired U.S. Sen. Pete Domenici, the Sandias were designated as a protected wilderness area.

Now, our U.S. senators, Tom Udall and Jeff Bingaman, have introduced the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Wilderness Act. It would designate 259,000 acres as wilderness and create a 100,850-acre conservation area around the Organ and Doña Ana Mountains and parts of Broad Canyon. The Bureau of Land Management would manage the land to protect it from development, but current uses, such as hunting and grazing, would continue.

The area has been under study since 2006, when Domenici proposed protecting more than 200,000 acres of federal land in Doña Ana County as wilderness, creating a 35,000-acre conservation area around the Organ Mountains and allowing the BLM to sell off about 65,000 acres. It didn’t fly at the time, and years of negotiations ensued.

Now a fairly broad consensus has been reached by some interests — conservationists, hunters, business people, hikers, local governments and even some ranchers — that the areas should be protected, although other ranchers and off-road enthusiasts still have concerns over access.

The bill is expected to be heard this week in the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, which Bingaman chairs. This is a rare opportunity to set aside some natural resource gems for the enjoyment of generations to come.

Our wilderness around Las Cruces deserves protection

EDITORIAL
From the Las Cruces Sun-News

09/26/2009

For some three decades now, the most pristine areas of the Organ Mountains and other natural treasurers just outside Las Cruces have been regulated under a federal designation that was intended to be temporary — a wilderness study area.

It seems to us there has been plenty of time for study, now it’s time for action. Last week, New Mexico’s two senators, Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, introduced a bill that would designate 259,000 acres as wilderness and place another 100,000 acres as a national conservation area. And on Tuesday, the Doña Ana County Commission threw its support behind the measure.

The land to be protected includes the Organ Mountains Wilderness and the Organ Mountains National Conservation Area west of Las Cruces; the Potrillo Mountains Wilderness, the Aden Lava Flow Wilderness, the Cinder Cone Wilderness and the Whitehorn Wilderness, all in southwestern Doña Ana County; and the Sierra de las Uvas Wilderness, the Broad Canyon Wilderness, the Robledo Mountains Wilderness and the Desert Peaks National Conservation Area, all south of Hatch and northwest of Las Cruces.

Introduction of the bill elicited the same arguments from the same adversaries that we’ve been hearing for years. Ranchers who work leased land in the designated areas are concerned that a wilderness designation could hamper their operations. They worry that they would restrict water projects, limit access to their herds and stock tanks and prevent them from making needed improvements to their operations.

We fully appreciate the importance of ranching to a diversified county economy and have no desire to see those operation diminished. If we believed a wilderness designation would have the dire consequences that have been predicted, we’d have second thoughts about offering our endorsement.

In fact, we see no reason why wilderness and ranching can’t co-exist. The federal designation has specific provisions designed to carve out the exemptions ranchers need to run their operations. We believe local ranchers would be better-served working with Bingaman and Udall to ensure that their needs are protected under the bill now being considered, rather than fighting to defeat the bill.

Without protection, these precious lands will be lost to the urban sprawl that will surely come to our area in the years ahead. With wilderness protection, they will be preserved to be enjoyed by future generations.

We commend Bingaman and Udall for introducing this important legislation, and urge all those who treasure these special areas to make your voices heard.

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